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Donor found for toddler born without kidneys; Tyler Perry buys mother car

A Georgia mother whose toddler has been waiting for a kidney transplant his whole life was given a car on Tuesday — hours before a kidney donor was found.

>> PREVIOUS STORY: Toddler’s kidney transplant stalled due to dad’s latest arrest

Carmellia Burgess of Gwinnett County brought her son home from Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta on Nov. 8, where he’d been since Oct. 29. 

The family expected to wait for the news that his father, Anthony Dickerson, would be permitted to donate a kidney after a battle with the transplant team over his criminal history.

>> On AJC.com: Toddler heads home from hospital to wait for kidney transplant

AJ battled a potentially deadly infection, contracted pneumonia, had surgery to implant a new port for his dialysis treatments and received blood transfusions before he was released from the hospital, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution previously reported.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

But his mother didn’t have a car to get AJ to his hemodialysis appointments three times a week, she posted on Facebook.

That trouble ended Tuesday, when actor Tyler Perry gave Burgess a new car.

>> See her Facebook post here

The family later learned a deceased donor kidney will be given to AJ on Wednesday, attorney Mawuli Davis said.

>> Read more trending news 

“Father and mother are there excited and are being supported by Mr. Dickerson’s mentor, David Manuel, and Pastor Derrick Rice from Sankofa Church.

Who won 'Dancing With the Stars' season 25?

Congratulations are in order for Jordan Fisher and pro Lindsay Arnold.

On Tuesday night, “Dancing With the Stars” season 25 wrapped up in a two-part finale that left the audience and viewers at home on the edge of their seats.

Fisher and Arnold were big fan favorites and front-runners for most of the season after receiving five perfect scores from the judges through the semi-finals. Both Fisher and Arnold nursed injuries this season but performed through the pain on more than one occasion to bring home the Mirror Ball. Fisher suffered a scratched cornea going into the semi-finals while Arnold performed through a knee injury sustained early on in the season.

>> Read more trending news 

Their injuries didn’t keep them down and, on Tuesday night, they were crowned the season 25 champs. This is Arnold’s first Mirror Ball win as a pro even though she made it to the final three during three other seasons. This is a huge win for her! The “Hamilton” star is no stranger to getting onstage but winning the competition was a huge achievement for him!

Fans on social media reacted to the big news after following along for two nights. While it seemed they were split on which of the final three couples they wanted to win, many were ecstatic for champions Fisher and Arnold:

Russian baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky dies at 55

Dmitri Hvorostovsky, the Russian baritone known for his velvety voice, dashing looks and shock of flowing white hair, died Wednesday at a hospice near his home in London, a few years after he was diagnosed with a brain tumor. He was 55.

Called "the Elvis of opera" and the "Siberian Express" by some, Hvorostovsky announced in June 2015 that he had been diagnosed with the tumor. He returned to New York's Metropolitan Opera three months later to sing the Count di Luna in Verdi's "Il Trovatore" and was greeted with a loud and lengthy ovation that caused him to break character. Musicians in the orchestra threw white roses during the curtain calls.

Despite his illness, he sang in Tchaikovsky's "Eugene Onegin" at London's Royal Opera that December, in Verdi's "Simon Boccanegra" and "Un Ballo in Maschera (A Masked Ball)" at the Vienna State Opera the following spring and gave his final four staged opera performances as Giorgio Germont in Verdi's "La Traviata" in Vienna, the last on Nov. 29 last year. He announced the following month that balance issues had caused him to cancel future opera appearances.

"Dima was a truly exceptional artist — a great recitalist as well as a great opera singer, which is rare," said soprano Renee Fleming, who teamed with Hvorostovsky for a memorable run of "Onegin" among their many performances. "His timbre, musicality, musicianship, technique, and especially his capacity for endless phrases, were second to none. I have no doubt that he would have sung beautifully for another 20 years or more, had he not been taken from us. I can't hear Eugene Onegin, Valentin in Faust or Simon Boccanegra without longing to hear Dmitri. He brought an innate nobility and intense commitment to every role."

Hvorostovsky made a dramatic unscheduled appearance at the Met last May for a gala celebrating the 50th anniversary of the company's move to Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. Walking stiffly, looking thin and with his cheekbones more pronounced, Hvorostovsky received a standing ovation and lit into Rigoletto's second-act aria "Cortigiani, vil razza dannata (Courtiers, vile cursed kind)." Some in the audience had tears in their eyes, and many pulled cellphones from their glittering handbags to snap photos as he walked through the lobby during intermission.

His last public concerts were on June 22 and June 23 at the Grafenegg Festival in Austria. In September, he was awarded the Order of Merit for the Fatherland by Russia President Vladimir Putin for contributions to the nation's art and culture.

"Words cannot express my anguish that one of the greatest voices of our time has been silenced," tenor Placido Domingo said. "Dmitri's incomparably beautiful voice and peerless artistry touched the souls of millions of music lovers. His passing will be mourned by his countless admirers around the world and by those of us who were fortunate to know him."

The Met dedicated Friday's performance of Verdi's Requiem to Hvorostovsky.

"One of opera's all-time greats, truly an artist for the ages," Met General Manager Peter Gelb said. "In addition to his astounding vocal gifts, he had an electrifying stage presence and a charisma that won over both his adoring audiences and his devoted colleagues."

The Vienna State Opera scheduled a minute of silence before Wednesday's performance of Strauss' "Salome."

"I especially admire the wonderful way in which he carried himself during this terrible illness," Vienna State Opera Director Dominique Meyer said. "Dima leaves a great void behind. He will stay in our memories as an exceptional artist who always gave a hundred percent."

Hvorostovsky was born on Oct. 16, 1962, and grew up in Krasnoyarsk, in central Siberia. He started piano lessons when he was 7, only for his first piano teacher to tell him he was untalented. At Krasnoyarsk Pedagogical School and Krasnoyarsk High School of Arts, he thrived in music, boxing and soccer. "Apart from this, I was the worst pupil in school," he said with a straight face.

He became a soloist at the Krasnoyarsk Opera in 1986, won the Russian Glinka National Competition, then attracted attention by winning vocal contests at Toulouse, France, in 1988 and then Cardiff in 1989 — where he beat out Welsh bass-baritone Bryn Terfel for the top prize.

With long hair that turned prematurely silver before he was 35 and then polar bear white, he was instantly recognizable. Hvorostovky's public musical persona started with a rock 'n' roll band, when he was a teen-age rebel under communism.

"Ah! Freedom! So what could I do?" he remembered in a 1998 interview with The Associated Press. "I had a few options — to become a street fighter, or I could become a hero in front of my girlfriends."

He made his Royal Opera debut in 1992 as Riccardo in Bellini's "I Puritani" and his Met debut in 1995 as Prince Yeletsky in Tchaikovsky's "Pique Dame (The Queen of Spades)." He was lauded around the world for definitive performances as Onegin and also celebrated for the title role in Mozart's "Don Giovanni," Valentin in Gounod's "Faust" and Belcore in Donizetti's "L'Elisir d'Amore (The Elixir of Love)."

"The sheer beauty of his voice and his matinee-idol good looks made him a favorite with any audience," Royal Opera music director Antonio Pappano said. "The joy with which he approached performing was unique."

Hvorostovsky is survived by his wife Florence Hvorostovsky, their son, Maxim, and daughter, Nina, and twins Alexandra and Daniel from his first marriage, to Svetlana Hvorostovsky.

___

Associated Press Writer Nataliya Vasilyeva in Moscow contributed to this report.

David Cassidy: A rocking romancer to millions of young fans

David Cassidy could sell the heck out of uncertainty.

"I Think I Love You," the smash hit that in 1970 launched the Partridge Family musical group plus the ABC comedy-with-songs show of the same name, found Cassidy center stage delivering such lyrics as "I think I love you, so what am I so afraid of?/ I'm afraid that I'm not sure of a love there is no cure for."

There was no doubt: At 20, Cassidy was the radiant man-boy to help usher young girls (and young boys, for that matter) into the untold mysteries of pubescence, adolescence, romance and rock 'n' roll.

For all that, millions knew they loved him.

Within a few years, those legions of fans would outgrow him, just as Cassidy would outgrow himself, or, at least, what had made him a superstar. His cherubic looks would fade along with his popularity; his laddish proto-Farrah-Fawcett shag would thin. It needn't have shocked him or anybody else; the odds of sustaining that white-hot level of success were no less great than for his having been ignited as a star in the first place. Lightning seldom strikes even once, much less twice.

Cassidy, 67, who announced earlier this year that he had been diagnosed with dementia, died Tuesday surrounded by his family. No further details were immediately available, but publicist JoAnn Geffen said on Saturday that Cassidy was in a Fort Lauderdale, Florida, hospital suffering from organ failure.

"The Partridge Family" aired from 1970-74 and was intended at first as a vehicle for Shirley Jones, the Oscar-winning actress and Cassidy's stepmother. Jones played Shirley Partridge, a widow with five children with whom she forms a popular act that travels on a psychedelic bus. The cast also featured Cassidy as eldest son and family heartthrob Keith Partridge; Susan Dey, later of "L.A. Law" fame, as sibling Laurie Partridge and Danny Bonaduce as sibling Danny Partridge.

"The Partridge Family" never cracked the top 10 in TV ratings, but the recordings under their name, mostly featuring Cassidy, Jones and session players, produced real-life musical hits and made Cassidy a real-life musical superstar. "I Think I Love You" was the Partridges' best-known song, spending three weeks on top of the Billboard chart at a time when other hit singles included James Taylor's "Fire and Rain" and Smokey Robinson and the Miracles' "The Tears of a Clown." The group also reached the top 10 with "I'll Meet You Halfway" and "Doesn't Somebody Want to be Wanted," and Cassidy had a solo hit with "Cherish."

"In two years, David Cassidy has swept hurricane-like into the pre-pubescent lives of millions of American girls," Rolling Stone magazine noted in 1972. "Leaving: six and a half million long-playing albums and singles; 44 television programs; David Cassidy lunch boxes; David Cassidy bubble gum; David Cassidy coloring books and David Cassidy pens; not to mention several millions of teen magazines, wall stickers, love beads, posters and photo albums."

Cassidy's appeal faded after the show went off the air, although he continued to tour, record and act over the next 40 years, his albums including "Romance" and the awkwardly titled "Didn't You Used To Be?" He had a hit with "I Write the Songs" before Barry Manilow's chart-topping version and success overseas with "The Last Kiss," featuring backing vocals from Cassidy admirer George Michael. He made occasional stage and television appearances, including an Emmy-nominated performance on "Police Story."

Even while "The Partridge Family" was still in primetime, Cassidy worried that he was being mistaken for the wholesome character he played. He posed naked for Rolling Stone in 1972, when he confided that he had dropped acid as a teenager and smoked pot in front of the magazine's reporter as he watched an episode of "The Partridge Family" and mocked his own acting.

Cassidy would endure personal and financial troubles. He was married and divorced three times, battled alcoholism, was arrested for drunk driving and in 2015 filed for bankruptcy. Cassidy had two children, musician Beau Cassidy and actress Katie Cassidy, with whom he acknowledged having a distant relationship.

"I wasn't her father. I was her biological father but I didn't raise her," he told People magazine in 2017. "She has a completely different life."

Cassidy himself was estranged from his father. Born in New York City in 1950, he was the son of actors Jack Cassidy and Evelyn Ward and half brother of entertainer Shaun Cassidy. David Cassidy's parents split up when he was 5 and he would long express regret about Jack Cassidy, who soon married Shirley Jones, being mostly absent from his life. David Cassidy stayed with his mother and by the early 1960s had moved to Los Angeles.

Kicked out of high school for truancy, David Cassidy dreamed of becoming an actor and had made appearances on "Bonanza," ''Ironside" and other programs before producers at ABC asked him to audition for "The Partridge Family," unaware that he could sing and intending at first to have him mime songs to someone else's voice. Cassidy, who only learned during tryouts that Jones would play his mother, worried that Keith Partridge would be a "real comedown" from his previous roles.

"I mean, how much could an actor do with a line like, 'Hi, Mom, I'm home from school,' or 'Please pass the milk?'" he wrote in his memoir. "I didn't see how it could do much for me. After all, I wasn't the star of it. Shirley had top billing; I was just one of the kids."

Of course, that wasn't how it worked out.

In the show's musical numbers, he was placed front and center, upstaging Jones, an actress whose beauty and crystalline vocals had graced the movie musicals "Carousel," ''Oklahoma!" and "The Sound of Music." Her voice was buried in the chorus of the other lesser "Partridges."

And while Dey, who was 17 when "The Partridge Family" debuted, soon won a rapt following among the show's boy viewers, she, too, was eclipsed by Cassidy.

It was he who could sell the chaste romanticism of "I woke up this mornin,'/ Went to sleep with you on my mind." For a glorious instant, he made mysteries clearer in the minds of his millions of fans.

___

AP National Writer Hillel Italie contributed to this report.

Photos: David Cassidy through the years

The Latest: Rashida Jones denies report about Pixar chief

The Latest on allegations against Pixar co-founder John Lasseter that have led him to take a leave of absence (all times local):

7:15 p.m.

Rashida Jones is denying a report that she quit working on "Toy Story 4" because of unwanted advances by Pixar co-founder John Lasseter.

Jones and her writing partner Will McCormack say in a statement first released to The New York Times on Tuesday that they left the company because of creative and philosophical differences. Their statement called on Pixar to do more to hire women and people of color for creative positions, including as directors.

The statement came hours after the trade magazine The Hollywood Reporter reported that Lasseter made an "unwanted advance" toward Jones. Lasseter announced Tuesday he was taking a sabbatical in a vaguely-worded memo that cited "missteps" with employees.

The statement from Jones and McCormack says "The Hollywood Reporter" does not speak for them. It applauded unnamed sources included in the Reporter's story who told the trade magazine Lasseter's actions made them uncomfortable.

___

1 p.m.

Pixar co-founder and Walt Disney Animation chief John Lasseter is taking a six-month leave of absence citing "missteps" with employees.

In a vaguely-worded memo obtained by The Associated Press Tuesday, Lasseter says he knows he has made some employees feel disrespected and uncomfortable. He apologized to anyone who has received an unwanted hug or gesture and to those he has "let down."

A Disney spokesperson says the company is committed to maintaining a respectful work environment and fully supports Lasseter's sabbatical.

Lasseter is known for directing films like "Toy Story" and "Cars" and has produced every Pixar feature since "Monster's, Inc." He has been the chief creative officer for Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios since 2006, overseeing hits like "Frozen" and "Moana."

Pixar's "Coco" hits theaters Thanksgiving Day.

Photos: Notable deaths 2017

Teen idol David Cassidy, 'Partridge Family' star, dies at 67

David Cassidy, the teen and pre-teen idol who starred in the 1970s sitcom "The Partridge Family" and sold millions of records as the musical group's lead singer, died Tuesday at age 67.

Cassidy, who announced earlier this year that he had been diagnosed with dementia, died surrounded by his family, a family statement released by publicist JoAnn Geffen said. No further details were immediately available, but Geffen said on Saturday that Cassidy was in a Fort Lauderdale, Florida, hospital suffering from organ failure.

"David died surrounded by those he loved, with joy in his heart and free from the pain that had gripped him for so long," the statement said. Thank you for the abundance and support you have shown him these many years."

"The Partridge Family" aired from 1970-74 and was a fictional variation of the '60s performers the Cowsills, intended at first as a vehicle for Shirley Jones, the Oscar winning actress and Cassidy's stepmother. Jones played Shirley Partridge, a widow with five children with whom she forms a popular act that travels on a psychedelic bus. The cast also featured Cassidy as eldest son and family heartthrob Keith Partridge; Susan Dey, later of "L.A. Law" fame, as sibling Laurie Partridge and Danny Bonaduce as sibling Danny Partridge.

It was an era for singing families — the Osmonds, the Jacksons. "The Partridge Family" never cracked the top 10 in TV ratings, but the recordings under their name, mostly featuring Cassidy, Jones and session players, produced real-life musical hits and made Cassidy a real-life musical superstar. The Partridges' best known song, "I Think I Love You," spent three weeks on top of the Billboard chart at a time when other hit singles included James Taylor's "Fire and Rain" and Smokey Robinson and the Miracles' "The Tears of a Clown." The group also reached the top 10 with "I'll Meet You Halfway" and "Doesn't Somebody Want to be Wanted" and Cassidy had a solo hit with "Cherish."

"In two years, David Cassidy has swept hurricane-like into the pre-pubescent lives of millions of American girls," Rolling Stone magazine noted in 1972. "Leaving: six and a half million long-playing albums and singles; 44 television programs; David Cassidy lunch boxes; David Cassidy bubble gum; David Cassidy coloring books and David Cassidy pens; not to mention several millions of teen magazines, wall stickers, love beads, posters and photo albums."

Cassidy's appeal faded after the show went off the air, although he continued to tour, record and act over the next 40 years, his albums including "Romance" and the awkwardly titled "Didn't You Used To Be?" He had a hit with "I Write the Songs" before Barry Manilow's chart-topping version and success overseas with "The Last Kiss," featuring backing vocals from Cassidy admirer George Michael. He made occasional stage and television appearances, including an Emmy-nominated performance on "Police Story."

Meanwhile, "The Partridge Family" remained popular in re-runs and Cassidy, who kept his dark bangs and boyish appearance well into middle age, frequently turned up for reunions and spoke often about his early success.

"So many people come up to me and talk to me about the impact it (the show) had," he told Arsenio Hall in 1990.

Even while "The Partridge Family" was still in primetime, Cassidy worried that he was mistaken for the wholesome character he played. He posed naked for Rolling Stone in 1972, when he confided that he had dropped acid as a teenager and smoked pot in front of the magazine's reporter as he watched an episode of "The Partridge Family" and mocked his own acting. Cassidy maintained an exhausting schedule during the show's run, filming during the week and performing live shows over the weekend, but had plenty of time to indulge himself. In the memoir "Could It Be Forever," he wrote of his prolific sex life and of rejecting Dey's advances because she lacked the "slutty aspect of a female that I always found so attractive."

Cassidy would endure personal and financial troubles. He was married and divorced three times, battled alcoholism, was arrested for drunk driving and in 2015 filed for bankruptcy. Cassidy had two children, musician Beau Cassidy and actress Katie Cassidy, with whom he acknowledged having a distant relationship.

"I wasn't her father. I was her biological father but I didn't raise her," he told People magazine in 2017. "She has a completely different life."

Cassidy himself was estranged from his father. Born in New York City in 1950, he was the son of actors Jack Cassidy and Evelyn Ward and half-brother of entertainer Shaun Cassidy. David Cassidy's parents split up when he was 5 and he would long express regret about Jack Cassidy, who soon married Shirley Jones, being mostly absent from his life. David Cassidy stayed with his mother and by the early 1960s had moved to Los Angeles.

Kicked out of high school for truancy, David Cassidy dreamed of becoming an actor and had made appearances on "Bonanza," ''Ironside" and other programs before producers at ABC television asked him to audition for "The Partridge Family," unaware that he could sing and intending at first to have him mime songs to someone else's voice. Cassidy, who only learned during tryouts that Jones would play his mother, worried that Keith Partridge would be a "real comedown" from his previous roles.

"I mean, how much could an actor do with a line like, 'Hi, Mom, I'm home from school,' or 'Please pass the milk?'" he wrote in his memoir. "I didn't see how it could do much for me. After all, I wasn't the star of it. Shirley had top billing; I was just one of the kids."

Chrissy Teigen, John Legend expecting second child together

Chrissy Teigen and John Legend are expanding their family.

The model and the musician used social media Tuesday to announce they're expecting their second child together.

Teigen posted a video on Instagram that shows the couple's daughter, Luna, with her hands on her mother's stomach. When Teigen asks, "What's in here?" the toddler responds, "Baby."

Legend can be heard laughing in the background.

He linked to the video on Twitter, captioning it with two hearts and two baby emojis.

Teigen also posted a self-portrait on Snapchat of her protruding stomach in a fitted black dress. "Very excited to not have to hide this anymore," she wrote.

Teigen, 31, and Legend, 38, were married in 2013. Luna was born in 2016.

Donald Fagen Sues Walter Becker's Estate Over Steely Dan Ownership

Donald Fagen's plan to continue Steely Dan in Walter Becker's absence has run into a road block.

Continue reading…

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