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Man brings his own beanbag chair onto train, becomes internet hero

Earlier this week, a man brought his own beanbag chair onto a subway train and immediately became a star after a picture of him went viral.

One of the man’s fellow passengers snapped a photo of him and tweeted it out, writing, “A dude on my train has brought his own beanbag and is sitting on it.”

A dude on my train has brought his own beanbag and is sitting on it pic.twitter.com/8O8WaYoRSu — Holly Brockwell (@holly) October 16, 2017

RELATED: Mom tries to use slang while texting her daughter — and the internet collectively gasped

Twitter users applauded the man’s genius idea with one person writing, “We’re living in 2017 while this guys [sic] living in 3017.”

“Not all heroes wear capes,” another wrote.

Many, many more shared their reactions:

Sometimes the best subway seat is the one you bring with you. pic.twitter.com/5bGDzXwpo1 — Trammell Hudson™ (@qrs) October 16, 2017 pic.twitter.com/lOBvX4C7It — Tom Pritchard (@tepritchard) October 16, 2017

RELATED: Girl gets pulled over by cops for dressing like Shrek — and Twitter had a field day

Flip over an open can of liquid without spilling a single drop

Your eyes aren’t deceiving you, and you’re not drunk (or are you?) — he really is suspending the liquid inside an upside-down can.

This looks like a complicated illusion, but it’s actually easier than you think.

Watch the video

RELATED: Dazzle everyone at the bar by transferring beer from a bottle to a cup without pouring

To pull this off, all you’ll need is a can of a certain beverage that “gives you wings,” if you understand what we’re saying. You need to use that particular drink because its can is the perfect shape for the trick.

Then, wow all your friends with your amazing liquid suspension abilities!

Mom tries to use slang while texting her daughter — and the internet collectively gasped

One Twitter user recently received a shocking text from her mother, who had attempted to use some slang while warning her about ice on the back deck but failed miserably.

“Be careful when you leave in the morning it’s ass eating season!!!!” the mother sent her daughter, Grace.

“Mom what do you think ‘ass eating season’ means?” Grace asked.

“There’s frost on the deck! Slippery!!!!!” her mother texted back. “You’ll fall and eat ass.”

RELATED: Instagram users share photos of themselves before and after having kids — and oof

!!!!!!!!! WHO DID THIS TO MY INNOCENT MOTHER !!!!!!!! pic.twitter.com/zneJIzKu6f — Grace (@graceL721) October 19, 2017

Grace shared a screenshot of the hilarious exchange on Twitter, writing, “WHO DID THIS TO MY INNOCENT MOTHER !!!!!!!!” Almost immediately, other Twitter users, who found her mom’s innocence adorable, took note of Grace’s 127 unread text messages:

!!!!!!!!!! WHY DOES SHE HAVE 127 UNREAD MESSAGES !!!!!!! — Josh Patterson (@cjdubbya) October 19, 2017 More alarming to me is the 127 unread texts — Katie Nix (@KatieHNix) October 19, 2017 But why does this person have 127 other messages. That's stressing me out. — Britt (@cuddleholic) October 19, 2017

RELATED: Woman goes on Twitter rant about worst AOL Instant Messenger conversation of her life

Apple pie on the go! These delightful fall desserts fit in the palm of your hand

I absolutely love these caramel apple hand pies. So does Tyson, but he hates the phrase “hand pie.” He thinks it discriminates against people who don’t have hands, and he insisted I call them “apple pies on the go.”

So — today, I’m going to show you how to make apple pies on the go.

Watch the video

RELATED: This rich and hearty baked potato soup is so easy to make in a slow cooker

These pies are so small, they fit in the palm of your hand (hence the name “hand pie,” Tyson), and that means you don’t need to feel guilty about reaching for a second one.

You will need:
  • 4 cups apples, peeled and diced
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 10 caramel squares (or more if you really love caramel)
  • ¼ cup sugar + more for sprinkling
  • Juice of ½ lemon
  • Egg wash
  • Refrigerated pie crust

You’ll also need a round cookie cutter that at least three inches in diameter. As you may remember from  my mini pumpkin pie video , I don’t own a round cookie cutter, so I use a drinking glass.

I’m a firm believer that everything tastes better in a pie crust. You could put a booger in a pie crust, and it would be delicious. OK, maybe that’s a stretch — but you know what I mean.

More delicious Elissa the Mom recipes that use pie crusts

Watch new videos from  Elissa the Mom  every Monday, Wednesday and Friday!

Why are more black women dying of breast cancer compared to white women?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, black women under 60 years old are more likely to die from breast cancer than white women in the same age group. In fact, data from 2015 showed black women had a 39 percent higher breast cancer death rate.

>> Read more trending news

New research from Emory University, the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute points to differences in health insurance as the culprit.

The findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, included data from the National Cancer Data Base on 563,497 black and white women between the ages of 18 and 64 who had been diagnosed with stage I to stage III breast cancer between 2004 and 2013.

The researchers examined five factors for the study:

  • Demographics (age, stage, state, year of diagnosis, etc.)
  • Comorbidities (other health conditions)
  • Insurance (lack of insurance, private insurance, Medicare/Medicaid, etc.)
  • Tumor characteristics (size, type, stage, etc.)
  • Treatment (chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, surgery, etc.)

The findings

They found that insurance explained one-third of the additional risk of death among the black women compared to white women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer.

Additionally, almost three times as many black women (22.7 percent) were either uninsured or had Medicaid insurance compared to white women (8.4 percent).

“Lack of insurance is a barrier to receipt of timely and high-quality treatment and screening services,” study authors wrote.

Other major factors that explained the differences: tumor characteristics (23.2 percent), comorbidities (11.3 percent) and treatment (4.8 percent).

Nearly 80 percent of the women in the study had the most common type of breast cancer (hormone receptor-positive breast cancer) and according to the researchers, when matched for factors such as insurance, comorbidity and others, those factors accounted for a combined 76.3 percent of the total excess risk of death in black patients.

The authors noted that when it came to treatment differences, black and white women contrasted most for hormone therapy, which, according to ACS, is typically used after surgery to help reduce the chance of recurrence.

“Several studies reported that black women are less likely to complete chemotherapy and hormone therapy,” study author Ahmedin Jemal told the ACS. “This could be for many reasons, including problems with transportation or the inability to pay for medicine.”

Additionally, previous research has shown that black women get lower quality mammograms and are less likely to have a follow-up appointment after receiving abnormal mammograms.

And insurance is vital for both high-quality cancer care and for early detection.

“We know so much about cancer prevention and control,” Jemal, who is also vice president of the ACS surveillance and health services research program, said. “But we’re not applying it to the whole population equally. We have to make the standard of care available to everyone, including people with low income. And blacks are disproportionately represented in that group.”

Read the full study at ascopubs.org

Learn more about the study and more about how women can protect themselves from breast cancer at cancer.org

3 simple ways to resist mindless snacking on junk food at work

It’s 3:30 p.m. on a Wednesday, and you’re barely making it through the workday. You feel like you’re about to fall asleep at your desk — until someone announces that there’s birthday cake in the break room!

Do you immediately hop up and grab a slice, knowing the sugar rush will result in a crash that’ll make you even more tired than before?

Watch the video

Plenty of people do that. After all, office junk food is hard to resist. But we eat it at the expense of our overall health.

RELATED: Turns out that adding calorie counts to fast food menus didn’t change a damn thing

If you find yourself mindlessly snacking throughout the workday, here are three ways to resist the siren song of candy, chips and yes, birthday cake.

1. Pack a lunch…

…and fill it with your own healthy snacks. Better yet, drink a protein shake before grabbing that slice of cake. It’ll make you feel fuller, which reduces your chance of overeating the bad stuff.

2. Out of sight, out of mind

If a coworker keeps a candy jar on his or her desk, politely ask that person to move it to a place where you can’t see it.

3. Download a nutrition app

Use the app to track all the food you eat throughout the day. Once you see just how many calories you consume, you’ll probably want to find places to cut back.

Critics say Museum of Ice Cream’s plastic sprinkles pose environmental risks 

Environmentalists in San Francisco and Los Angeles are concerned about the effects of one feature at local Museum of Ice Cream locations: sprinkles. 

>> Read more trending news

Critics say the plastic pieces are littering California streets blocks from the pop-up museums as they’re carried out on the clothes of museum visitors. The plastic material becomes litter and has the potential to end up in the water, a danger to marine life, KABC reported. 

“My concern is that they go down the drains and into the bay, where they will be bite-sized for most fish,” San Francisco resident Johanna Sanders told the San Francisco Gate.

The Museum of Ice Cream, which opened in Los Angeles in April and San Francisco in September, is known for its colorful displays, tasty treats and Instagram-worthy photo backdrops. 

According to a Forbes description of the LA location, there’s a “gallery of suspended bananas, ... rooms of giant melted popsicles, big-as-you gummy bears and a swimming pool full of sprinkles.” The San Francisco Gate describes its local pop-up as including “a candy garden, psychedelic rainbow unicorns, a pink rock climbing wall, banana swings, an all-pink diner with a jukebox and a sprinkle pool filled with more than 100 million plastic imitation sprinkles. A circular swimming space even has pink floats and a diving board.”

Both locations feature bright pink walls and interactive exhibits.

“All of the rooms in the museum have things you can eat or smell,” KABC reported.

The museums use plastic for the sprinkles in the pools instead of real, edible ones for sanitary reasons. A spokesperson for the Museum of Ice Cream told the Gate the sprinkles are coated in “antimicrobial germ bloc.”

Museum officials said they’re working to address people’s concerns. They’re working with an environmental specialist and also instructing exiting visitors to shake off excess sprinkles at an “air shower” at the San Francisco location, according to the Gate

But even still, “guests have been putting sprinkles in their pocket(s) as a memento of their experience in the sprinkle pool,” spokeswoman Shelley Reinstein said.

Eva Holman, with the Surfrider Foundation, a nonprofit environmental organization, said the plastic sprinkles pose risks that need to be taken more seriously. 

“If it's on the sidewalk it most likely goes into storm drains and then into the ocean,” Holman told the Gate. “(And) my 5-year-old would think it’s candy. Why wouldn’t a bird on the street think it’s something to consume?”

“Most plastic has a purpose, like bottle caps and food wrappers,” Holman said. “What is the purpose of this tiny piece of plastic other than a selfie moment?”

The Museum of Ice Cream’s Los Angeles location, originally slated to close in May, has had its close date pushed back five times due to popularity. It’s scheduled now to close in December. The San Francisco location will be open until Feb. 13, just in time for lovebirds to take their sweet someone before Valentine’s day. The museum was set to close in October, but officials extended the schedule after tickets sold out in just 18 minutes.

Read more at the San Francisco Gate.

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