Now Playing
102.3 WBAB
Last Song Played
L.I.'s Only Classic Rock!
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
102.3 WBAB
Last Song Played
L.I.'s Only Classic Rock!

pets

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >

35-pound cat joins adopted family for adorable wedding photos

The cat formerly known as Symba has had a busy time since he went viral in June for his eye-popping girth. 

The 35-pound orange tabby has since been adopted by a couple who got married on July 8.

Like many wedding guests, the cat, now named Vito, wanted to look his best. His new owners have placed him on a strict diet and a regular exercise regimen.

>> Read more trending news

The newlyweds posed with Vito in a series of photographs taken by Kristi Odom. Vito still has a ways to go to reach a healthy weight, but he looks like he's happy and content in his new home. 

Invasive toads in South Florida could kill pets

An invasive toad species are in high population in South Florida now that the rainy season is here, which means pets could come into contact with them. 

>> Read more trending news 

The Cane toad, also called giant or Bufo toads, secrete a milky-white toxin on their skin that can get dogs and cats sick if they bite or eat them.

» Tips to keep your dog cool in the summer

These toads are mostly found in yards near canals and ponds and have a reddish-brown to grayish-brown color with a yellow belly, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. 

The toads can grow from 6 to 9 inches long and breed year-long in standing water, streams, canals and ditches.

» Woman abandons 3-month-old puppy at airport, leaves tragic note

The Cane toad first made its mark in South Florida in the 1930s to help get rid of agricultural pests, but their population became fully established when pet traders let them loose in the 1950s, according to the FWC. Its native range is the Amazon basin in South America, north to the lower Rio Grande Valley in southern Texas.  

» Potentially deadly parasite found in 5 Florida counties

Veterinarians said if a dog licks a Cane toad, it can get seizures, have heart problems or even die, WTVJ reported. If a pet owner believes their dog or cat has come into contact with a toad, they should wash their pet’s mouth out immediately and call a veterinarian. 

Read more at NBCMiami.com.

Tips to keep your dog cool in the summer

Humans have been known to put pets in danger in the heat.

With some cities hitting triple-digit temperatures, it’s important to remember to keep our dogs and other pets safe during the warm summer months. 

Safety first

It’s already too hot to leave dogs in a parked car for any length of time without air conditioning. Even in the shade, cars heat up fast, and cracking the windows does not help much.

EMS in Travis County, Texas, recommend checking to see if your pet can go inside your destination before you leave home, and leaving your dog at home if not.

Cars aren’t the only danger during the sizzling season. Here are more hot weather pet tips from Travis County and PETA:

  • Keep dogs inside. They can’t sweat like humans and they’re wearing fur coats. Panting is their main way to release heat, and that won’t be enough when it’s really hot, especially if they’re forced to move around.
  • Don’t over-exercise your dog in high temperatures. Keep outdoor activity to dawn and dusk as much as possible, not the heat of the day. Carry water for you and your dog, and look for routes with water access, so your dog has a place to get wet and cool off (make sure dogs are allowed).
  • If you usually run with your dog, how about walking instead? Dogs want to please and can push themselves past the point of risking their own safety just to keep up. If your dog collapses in the heat, it might be too late.
  • Avoid hot pavement. A general rule: If the surface is too hot for your bare foot, it’s too hot for your dog’s paws. If you have to cross asphalt or another hot surface, keep your dog moving (don’t stand). Walk in grass as much as possible.
  • Don’t put your dog in the bed of a pickup truck. A sudden stop could throw your dog from the truck, or your dog could strangle itself if she’s tethered to the truck and jumps out.
  • Provide plenty of water and shade for pets when they are outside, and do the same for outdoor animals as well. Account for shifting sun patterns.

Know the signs

Do you know when your dog is getting dangerously overheated? A lot of people don’t. The City of Austin, Texas, posted signs on the hike-and-bike trail a few summers ago urging other people to alert owners when their dogs appeared to be getting too hot.

Here are more signs to look out for, according to trainers at the Canine Center for Training and Behavior:

  • Heavy panting, breathing or drooling, and restlessness.
  • A large tongue that appears to “bell out” at the end.
  • Dry or discolored gums (not easy to spot if your dog has darker gums).
  • A racing or erratic pulse.
  • If your dog is “dancing” on a surface, he might be trying to keep his feet cool.

Cool tools

A quick inquiry to dog-loving folks on Facebook and an online search turns up more than a dozen products designed to help keep your dog cool when the temperature rises.

The following are a few tools that can be used before, during or after outdoor activities (most available online and in stores). Remember: None of these tools replaces common sense and care in the heat. 

  • Around the neck: Wet and freeze a bandanna for a simple cooling tool. Two products you can buy (among others): The KoolCollar, a hollow collar filled with a cooling gel tube for indoor use (less messy), or ice cubes for outside ($18 to $20; www.koolcollar4dogs.com). The Chill Collar is a similar product; it's filled with a gel, and you freeze the whole thing before use ($39.95; www.inthecompanyofdogs.com). 
  • Around the body: Swamp coolers and similar products wrap around a dog's midsection for a whole-body cooldown. The Ruffwear version of a swamp cooler uses evaporative cooling to draw out body heat. Soak the vest-like product in cold water and wring it out before putting it on your dog. You can pour more water directly on the vest while your dog is wearing it, too ($59.95; www.ruffwear.com). The Kool Koat, which is made of shammy material that Velcros around the middle, works like a swamp cooler. It can help keep dogs’ rear ends and and bellies cool in the summer. ($20 to $85; www.pettemp.com
  • Lounging: Pads such as the K9 Cooling Mat and the Cool Bed Lounger (various styles and prices) provide a cool surface for your dog to recline upon. Another version is the Canine Cooler Therapeutic Pad, which is designed to ease inflammation and joint pain in dogs through a water-filled pad, but could be used for heat relief, too. For instant shade, you can pop up the Portable Pet Shade, a pop-up tent that folds up to fit in a carrying case (all at www.inthecompanyofdogs.com).

Read more at Austin360.com.

UPS driver adopts pit bull on her route after owner dies

Katie Newhouser is a local UPS driver in Rancho Cucamonga, California, who had a special bond with a pit bull on her route named Leo.

“He would hear my truck come into the condo complex and start barking and scratching at the door to come down to the truck,” Newhouser told PupJournal. “He would love to come into the truck and go into the back to look around.”

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

In October 2016, Newhouser learned through Facebook that Leo’s owner, Tina, had died. Her son was unable to take the dog in because he is in the Marines, so Newhouser offered to foster the dog. She already had three other dogs, though, and didn’t intend on keeping Leo.

However, her personal bond with Leo proved too strong to adopt him out to someone else, so Newhouser ended up keeping him.

>> See the Facebook post here

“The whole vibe in the house changed as soon as we brought him home,” she said. “He is the biggest, most lovable dog that you will ever meet. He was instantly running around the yard with my dogs.”

There were some adjustments for Leo, the biggest of which was living life without Tina.

>> Read more trending news

“I do know that Leo missed Tina when he first got here,” Newhouser said. “He would whine at night before he would fall asleep. It was heartbreaking, really. He still does every once in a while. I know he misses her.”

Despite missing Tina, Leo loves playing and lying in the yard with Newhouser’s other dogs and has a new family who will always love him.

Florida woman's puppy stolen from car during apparent road rage incident

A woman is accused of snatching another woman's 3-month-old puppy out of her open car window Wednesday while she waited at a red light near the University of South Florida in Tampa, the Tampa Bay Times reported.

>> Read more trending news

Laura Rodriguez, 22, told police that she was driving with her sister in the passenger seat when a car cut her off in traffic as she was approaching a turning lane. At the light, a woman got out of the car and began cursing and yelling, Rodriguez told police, apparently because she wasn't driving fast enough. 

The woman then reached into a half-open window and grabbed one of the two dogs in the back seat.

"We've had puppies stolen from yards and pet stores," Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Debbie Carter told the Times. "but nothing else I can remember about one being taken out of a person's vehicle." 

>> RELATED: Woman finds out day too late missing dog was adopted 

Rodriguez said the 8-pound, brown Labrador retriever puppy named Bella was snatched by her leash. The other rescue dog in the back seat dropped to the floor and started barking. The car sped away, ran a red light and disappeared into the USF campus, the Times story said. Rodriguez said she tried to follow the car, which was an old gray or dark-colored sedan with a male driver, but lost it.

Rodriguez has posted photos of Bella on Facebook in hopes of finding her. "She is a very attached puppy," Rodriguez wrote on the Lost and Found Pets of Hillsborough County page. "She needs me as much as I need her."

>> RELATED: Girl's tearful plea to find missing dog answered 

Bella and her other dog were adopted when they were abandoned by their owner, Rodriguez said. She might be able to offer a reward, but she doesn't have much money, she told the Times. "I just want to have my baby back."

Anyone with information about Bella's whereabouts can call sheriff's office investigators at (813) 247-8200.

• More from the Tampa Bay Times

Woman abandons 3-month-old puppy at airport, leaves sad note

The owner of a 3-month-old puppy claims in a heartbreaking note that she had no choice but to leave her Chihuahua at the airport. 

>> Read more trending news 

Someone found the abandoned puppy, named Chewy, in the bathroom at a Las Vegas airport over the weekend with a big bruise and bump on the head, KSNV reported. 

>>READ: Chaos, mob breaks at Ft. Lauderdale airport over cancelled flights

Along with Chewy was a note, telling the story of how the woman had endured domestic abuse by her ex-boyfriend and could not afford to take the dog with her on the plane. 

“Hi! I’m Chewy! My owner was in an abusive relationship and couldn’t afford me to get on the flight,” the note read. “She didn’t want to leave me with all her heart but she has NO other option. My ex-boyfriend kicked my dog when we were fighting and he has a big knot on his head. He probably needs a vet. I love Chewy sooo much – please love and take care of him.”

Chewy was taken to a local dog rescue and is reported to be OK, according to KSNV. 

The rescue center, Connor and Millie's Dog Rescue, wrote a post on Facebook Wednesday putting Chewy up for adoption. 

“It's gonna take weeks to dig through all those loving requesters,” the post read. 

A spokesperson from Connor and Millie’s Dog Rescue said that if the owner is safe and wants to get Chewy back they “will do what ever it takes to reunite them and keep them safe.” 

“We are very cognitive of the risks involved and she would have to provide positive proof of her relationship with Chewy,” the rescue center said in a statement. 

>>Baby born on Spirit flight from Fort Lauderdale gets lifelong airline perk

Read the full story at KSNV.

Reward climbs to $10,000 after dog found buried alive dies

PETA is offering $10,000 for information that leads to the arrest of the person responsible for burying a dog that later died in Tucker, Georgia, last month, the organization said Monday.

>> Watch a news report about the dog here

A brown Chow Chow mix was found June 6 buried up to her nose, and she might have been there for several days. She was dug out and taken to receive veterinary care, but she died the next day.

The case remains unsolved. 

>> Read more trending news

The reward announced Monday doubles the previous reward of $5,000.

"Someone must know where this dog came from and who buried her alive, leaving her to suffer in terror for days," PETA Vice President Colleen O'Brien said in a statement. "PETA is urging anyone with information about this dog or her tormentor to come forward immediately before anyone else gets hurt." 

DeKalb County resident Eric Purdue found the dog on an ATV trail near Rock Mountain Boulevard and Lewis Road. It took him 30 minutes to dig her out of the tightly packed ground.

He later named the dog Lulu.

Anyone with information about who buried Lulu is asked to call DeKalb County Animal Services at 404-294-2939.

Gnocchi the cat, a big bully who likes to chomp, seeks brave adopter

A cat rescue group in California posted an honest, humorous ad for one of their more difficult to adopt cases.

Gnocchi is a gorgeous, black-and-white Maine Coon mix, according to the ad posted by the Cat House on the Kings. Rescuers say he's a big boy with a big attitude. They admit Gnocchi is a bully who likes to pick on smaller cats (which is pretty much any cat since he's so large.)

>> Read more trending news

He also likes to "chomp" and give love bites when he gets “perturbed or overstimulated.” On Facebook, the group jokes that the "Jaws" theme is appropriate for Gnocchi, "who is a great white shark masquerading as a huge black and white fluffball."

The group says he's friendly and social when he wants to be, but at all other times, "just leave him the hell alone."

Gnocchi would make an ideal “guard cat,” rescuers say, because he would “no doubt take a huge chunk out of anyone he wanted to scare off.”

As for dogs, Gnocchi would probably do just fine with "non-wimpy dogs."

For anyone brave enough to adopt an "awesome cat with more fur, size and personality than you've probably ever encountered," Gnocchi is available at the Blackstone Ave Petco Adoption Center in Fresno.

Grumpy feral cat shows softer side when introduced to kittens

Mason may forever be a feral cat when it comes to humans, but he revealed a much softer side when he was introduced to kittens.

TinyKittens founder Shelly Roche told The Dodo that while treating a colony of feral cats and having them spayed and neutered, a 10-year-old male cat was discovered to have advanced kidney disease. Instead of euthanasia, Roche took Mason into her home to allow him to live out the rest of his life comfortably.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

Mason is still wary of humans, but when Roche brought home a litter of foster kittens, she decided to introduce the kittens to Mason. 

The results were captured in a Facebook video posted in May that has since gone viral. Mason immediately accepted the kittens, allowing them to climb on him and snuggle with him. Roche said she'd never seen Mason so relaxed before.

Roche continues to bring new litters of foster kittens to meet Mason.

These states have most overweight pets, research reveals

Dogs and cats in America are becoming increasingly overweight, according to a report from Banfield Pet Hospital.

Time reported that research from Banfield Pet Hospital released Tuesday shows that the number of overweight or obese pets in America is growing, and two states have the most hefty cats and dogs.

>> Read more trending news

The company, which operates close to 1,000 veterinary clinics in the U.S. and Puerto Rico, used information from 2.5 million dogs and 505,000 cats seen at Banfield Hospitals in 2016.

People reported that the ranking for the states with the most cats and dogs diagnosed as overweight both have Minnesota and Nebraska in the No. 1 and No. 2 spots. See the top 10 states in each category below.

Overweight and Obesity in  dogs per 100 cases:

  1. Minnesota: 41 of 100 dogs diagnosed as overweight
  2. Nebraska: 39 of 100 dogs diagnosed as overweight
  3. Michigan: 38 of 100 dogs diagnosed as overweight
  4. Idaho: 38 of 100 dogs diagnosed as overweight
  5. Nevada: 36 of 100 dogs diagnosed as overweight
  6. New Mexico: 34 of 100 dogs diagnosed as overweight
  7. Washington: 34 of 100 dogs diagnosed as overweight
  8. Utah: 34 of 100 dogs diagnosed as overweight
  9. Indiana: 34 of 100 dogs diagnosed as overweight
  10. Oregon: 34 of 100 dogs diagnosed as overweight

Overweight and Obesity in cats per 100 cases:

  1. Minnesota: 46 of 100 cats diagnosed as overweight
  2. Nebraska: 43 of 100 cats diagnosed as overweight
  3. Iowa: 42 of 100 cats diagnosed as overweight
  4. Idaho: 40 of 100 cats diagnosed as overweight
  5. Delaware: 39 of 100 cats diagnosed as overweight
  6. Michigan: 39 of 100 cats diagnosed as overweight
  7. Nevada: 38 of 100 cats diagnosed as overweight
  8. Kansas: 38 of 100 cats diagnosed as overweight
  9. Utah: 37 of 100 cats diagnosed as overweight
  10. New Mexico: 37 of 100 cats diagnosed as overweight

The hospital’s research found that lack of exercise, overfeeding, breed and genetics and the commonality of obesity in pets are some factors that contribute to how so many pets became overweight. 

Pet owners can manage the weight of their cats and dogs by coming up with a weight loss plan with their veterinarian, having more playtime with their pets and giving out less treats, particularly limiting human food.

More information can be found at Banfield.com.

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >