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Equifax CEO is out after massive data breach

Equifax CEO Richard Smith is out after the credit bureau reported a massive data breach earlier this month.

>> Read more trending news

The move, described as a retirement, was made effective immediately on Tuesday. Paulino do Rego Barros Jr., the head of Equifax’s Asian operations, has been named interim CEO, and board member Mark Feidler has been named non-executive chairman.

Officials with the Atlanta-based credit reporting and technology company said a “cyber security incident” might have exposed the personal information of 143 million Americans.

Hackers exploited a software glitch to gain access to the trove of personal data, the company said. Equifax disclosed earlier this month that the data breach was discovered in July and believed to have taken place from mid-May to July.

>> Related: Equifax, software maker blame each other for opening door to hackers

The data believed to have been accessed included names, Social Security numbers, birth dates and addresses.

In a statement, Feidler said, “The Board remains deeply concerned about and totally focused on the cybersecurity incident.”

“We are working intensely to support consumers and make the necessary changes to minimize the risk that something like this happens again,” he said. “We have formed a Special Committee of the Board to focus on the issues arising from the incident and to ensure that all appropriate actions are taken.”

Smith had been Equifax's CEO since 2005.

In a statement, Smith called his tenure at Equifax “an honor, and I’m indebted to the 10,000 Equifax employees who have dedicated their lives to making this a better company.”

Although many analysts had applauded Equifax's performance under Smith, he and the rest of his management team had come under fire for lax security and its response to the breach.

Smith is expected to testify before Congress in early October.

>> Related: Equifax apologizes for sending people to fake company website 

WSBTV obtained video of the Smith speaking to students and faculty at the University of Georgia last month, after the company’s massive data breach occurred but before the company disclosed it.

The company didn’t disclose the breach until Sept. 7.

The Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Trump's latest statement 'a declaration of war,' North Korean foreign minister says

North Korea's foreign minister on Monday told reporters that President Donald Trump has issued "a declaration of war" against the Hermit Kingdom in the president’s most recent statements on the country.

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However, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders insisted at a news briefing on Monday that no declaration had been made.

“We’ve not declared war on North Korea, and frankly the suggestion of that is absurd,” she said.

On Saturday, Trump said that North Korea "won't be around much longer" if it continues to threaten the United States.

 

Facebook to give Congress Russian-linked 2016 election ads

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said on Thursday that the social media company will turn over to Congress thousands of ads believed to have been bought by Russian agents attempting to influence last year’s presidential election.

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Facebook officials said earlier this month that more than 3,000 ads were uncovered that ran between 2015 and 2017 and appeared to have come from a Russian entity that aimed to influence the election.

Reports: Trump's controversial decisions in office under scrutiny by Mueller

Special counsel Robert Mueller has asked the White House for documents related to some of the most scrutinized decisions made by President Donald Trump while in office, The New York Times reported Wednesday.

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The request indicates that Trump’s actions in the White House are being included in the scope of Mueller’s investigation.

One dies, 7 injured in explosion on training field at Fort Bragg

One soldier has died after a training exercise accident at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. He was identified Thursday evening as Staff Sgt. Alexander P. Dalida, 32, of Dunstable, Mass.

Another seven people were injured in the explosion.

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 The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Number of dead rises to 8 after Florida nursing home left without power by Irma

A criminal investigation was launched as the number of deaths in a nursing home in Hollywood, Florida, increased to eight on Wednesday afternoon. The home was evacuated Wednesday morning, days after Hurricane Irma knocked out power, creating dangerous conditions for the elderly residents.

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Paramedics were called around 7:30 a.m. Wednesday to the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, WPLG reported.

The center is a 152-bed, skilled nurse facility located across the street from the Memorial Regional Hospital, according to the center’s website.

Obama calls decision to end protections for 'dreamers' cruel, self-defeating

Former President Barack Obama called the decision announced Tuesday to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program “cruel” and “self-defeating” in a lengthy statement posted to Facebook.

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Obama signed the executive order that created the program, better known as DACA, in 2012 after the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act, commonly known as the DREAM Act, failed to gain support in the U.S. Senate.

He said the decision Tuesday, announced by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, was politically motivated.

>> DACA: Trump administration ending 'dreamer' program for child immigrants

“Whatever concerns or complaints Americans may have about immigration in general, we shouldn’t threaten the future of this group of young people who are here through no fault of their own, who pose no threat, who are not taking away anything from the rest of us,” Obama said. “They are that pitcher on our kid’s softball team, that first responder who helps out his community after a disaster, that cadet in ROTC who wants nothing more than to wear the uniform of the country that gave him a chance. Kicking them out won’t lower the unemployment rate, or lighten anyone’s taxes, or raise anybody’s wages.”

The DACA program allowed immigrants who were brought to the United States illegally when they were children to stay in the country on a temporary basis, provided they met certain criteria.

“To target these young people is wrong – because they have done nothing wrong,” Obama said. “It is self-defeating – because they want to start new businesses, staff our labs, serve in our military, and otherwise contribute to the country we love. And it is cruel. What if our kid’s science teacher, or our friendly neighbor turns out to be a Dreamer? Where are we supposed to send her? To a country she doesn’t know or remember, with a language she may not even speak?”

>> Full transcript: Sessions announces end to DACA immigration program

Critics of Obama’s 2012 executive order, including Sessions himself, have said Obama overstepped his executive authority with the order.

Sessions said Tuesday that authorities will phase out DACA “to create a time period for Congress to act -- should it so choose.”

See Obama’s full comments:

DACA: Trump administration ending 'dreamer' program for child immigrants

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday that the Trump administration has decided to wind down former President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, better known as DACA.

>> Read more trending news

Police helicopter crashes at airport; 2 injured

Police in Gwinnett County, Georgia, said one of the department’s helicopters crashed on Friday at Briscoe Field in Lawrenceville.

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Authorities said two officers were conscious and talking after the crash. They were taken to a hospital for treatment.

The crash appeared to break the helicopter into two pieces, WSBTV.com reported. The helicopter's tail rotor broke off, and was about 20 feet from the fuselage. 

Navy recovers remains of 10 sailors killed in USS John S. McCain crash

Update 9:30 p.m. EDT Aug. 27: The U.S. Navy's 7th Fleet said on Sunday that officials have recovered the bodies of all 10 sailors killed when the USS John S. McCain collided with a merchant ship on Aug. 21 near Singapore.

Officials continue to investigate the collision.

Original report: The U.S. Navy on Thursday identified a sailor whose remains were found after the USS John S. McCain collided with a merchant ship near Singapore earlier this week.

>> Read more trending news

Divers recovered the remains of Electronics Technician 3rd Class Kenneth Aaron Smith, 22, officials said.

Nine other sailors remain missing. Navy officials identified them as:

  • Electronics Technician 1st Class Charles Nathan Findley, 31, from Missouri
  • Interior Communications Electrician 1st Class Abraham Lopez, 39, from Texas
  • Electronics Technician 2nd Class Kevin Sayer Bushell, 26, from Maryland
  • Electronics Technician 2nd Class Jacob Daniel Drake, 21, from Ohio
  • Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Timothy Thomas Eckels Jr., 23, from Maryland
  • Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Corey George Ingram, 28, from New York
  • Electronics Technician 3rd Class Dustin Louis Doyon, 26, from Connecticut
  • Electronics Technician 3rd Class John Henry Hoagland III, 20, from Texas
  • Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Logan Stephen Palmer, 23, from Illinois 

Crews searched a 2,100-square mile area east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore after the Liberian-flagged Alnic MC and the USS John S. McCain collided on Monday. Five sailors were injured.

>> Related: 10 sailors missing after USS John S. McCain collides with tanker

Divers continued Thursday to search the flooded compartments of the USS John S. McCain, although officials said the efforts had shifted from a rescue to a recovery mission.

Monday’s crash was the second major collision involving a U.S. Navy warship from the 7th Fleet in two months, according to The Navy Times. It is the fourth accident involving a naval vessel in the Pacific this year, according to The Washington Post.

Monday’s accident prompted officials to launch an investigation of the 7th Fleet. Navy Adm. John Richardson, chief of naval operations, said the Navy will take a one-day operational pause in response to the accident, to “ensure we are taking all appropriate immediate measures to enhance the Navy’s safe and effective operation around the world.”

>> Related: Navy plans operation pause, calls for review of collisions in the Pacific

The Associated Press reported on Wednesday that the commander of the 7th Fleet was dismissed in the aftermath of the crash.

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