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Why students don't have to stand for Pledge of Allegiance in Florida

Compiled from Associated Press and Florida News Service reports.

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Students excused from having to daily recite the Pledge of Allegiance in Florida public schools would no longer have to stand and hold their hands over their heart either, under a bill that is headed to the House floor.

The House Education Committee on Wednesday unanimously approved a bill (HB 1403) that would change how students are notified of their right to skip the daily pledge and what the excused student must do during the pledge.

Current law requires schools to conspicuously post a notice, telling students they don’t have to recite the pledge if a parent asks in writing for a student to be excused. The law also requires excused students to still stand and hold their hands over their hearts while the pledge is recited.

The bill would allow the notice to instead be placed in a student handbook, and excused students would no longer be required to stand or hold their hands over their hearts.

The bill was filed after a parent of a child at a Panhandle school told the school district it was not following notice requirements. A Senate companion bill has not yet been heard in the first of its three required committees.

School lunches: Here’s what your kids will be eating if this bill passes

A bipartisan Senate agreement expected to be voted on Wednesday will include some changes to the meals your children will be offered at school, and it may be changes that would bring them to the table.

The bill, which is expected to be passed by the full Senate, will offer more flexibility to the nations nearly 100,000 public schools as it eases requirements on the use of whole grains and delays a deadline to cut the level of sodium in school lunches.

The legislation has grown out of complaints by some schools that the requirements for their meals – changed in 2012 with the support of first lady Michelle Obama – are burdensome and that children are not eating the food.

To qualify for federal reimbursements for free and reduced-cost meals, schools are required to meet federal government nutrition guidelines. The guidelines set in 2012 imposed limits on the amount of fats, calories, sugar and sodium that meals could include.

Many schools balked at the standards, saying children would not eat the healthier options. Wednesday’s vote comes after a bill that would have allowed schools to opt out of the program entirely failed in 2014.

Per the bill, the Agriculture Department would be required to revised the whole grain and sodium standards for meals within 90 days of its passage.

Here’s how the legislation would change what school lunchrooms are serving:

Grains: Currently, all grains served in public schools must be whole grains, meaning the food made from grain must have been made using 100 percent of the original grain kernel. The new legislation requires that 80 percent  of the grains used be whole grain or more than half whole grain. (Currently, schools may request waivers from the whole grain requirement.)

Salt: The implementation of stricter standards for the amount of sodium in school meals would be delayed until 2019 under the new legislation. The bill would also fund a study into the benefits of lowering salt levels in school meals.

Waste: The problem of waste is a big one in school lunches. Under the new legislation, the Department of Agriculture and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would be tasked with coming up with a way to reduce what is not eaten by students – particularly fruits and vegetables. Children are currently required to take the food on the lunch line, but many toss them without touching a bite.

Summer programs: More money would be allocated for summer feeding programs – where school lunchrooms offer meals for children who qualify.

No Child Left Behind overhaul: What the new guidelines may look like

The House is set today to vote on a rewrite of the controversial No Child Left Behind education bill that has, for nearly a generation, increased the federal government’s role in elementary and secondary education in America.

The update to NCLB, called the “Every Student Succeeds Act,” (ESSA) will loosen some of the restrictions the NCLB placed on schools and transfer much of the job of measuring school progress to the states.

Here’s what NCLB is, what it requires and how it will change under ESSA

What is NCLB? 

The No Child Left Behind Act increased the role of the federal government in elementary and secondary education holding schools responsible for the academic progress of all its students – particularly focusing on  poor, minority and special education students and students for whom English is a second language.

It was not without many critics who railed against its heavy federal involvement  in local school  districts, the goals which many came to believe were unrealistic and the penalties that were deemed  harsh for “underperforming” schools.

How will it change under “Every Student Succeeds” Act, or ESSA?

  • States set their own goals for educating students and the rate at which the goals should be met. Under NCLB, the government  set the goal of every child in American public schools being proficient in math and reading by the end of the  school year in 2014. No state made that goal.
  • States still have to test students in math and reading in Grades 3 through 8 and then one year in high school. The results must be publicly reported.
  • Each state must come up with a way to judge a school’s performance. What would now be considered an “underperforming” school would be one which sits in the lowest-performing 5 percent of schools in the state.
  • Goals in judging how a school performs would have to include test scores, graduation rates and English proficiency rates. States,  however,  can include other factors they consider important to a school’s performance.
  • Instead of the sometimes severe actions underperforming schools could face under NCLB, each state will decided what action will be taken and how long the school could be considered “underperforming” before the action is taken.
  • The federal government  can no longer threaten to withhold funding as a means to force states to use test scores to evaluate the performance of teachers.
  • States would be able to use different (approved) tests in different parts of the state, instead of having  to use one test to measure for the entire state.
  • The Education Department may not give states incentives to use any particular set of teaching standards such as the curriculum guidelines  found in Common Core.
  • Title 1 money would not follow a low-income student to another school of their parent’s choice.  It would stay at the school to which it was first issued.
  • The new law would encourage caps on the time students spend taking standardized tests.
  • The language released Monday is based on a framework agreed to this month by a conference committee composed of lawmakers from both parties and both chambers of Congress.

Click here for the final text of a compromise bill that rewrites No Child Left Behind.  

   

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Fallout over yearbook quote may ruin girl's senior year

Fallout over yearbook quote may ruin girl's senior year

Parent outraged after daughter is assigned to pick cotton

A Washington state mother is outraged a teacher at Redmond Middle School assigned her daughter to pick cotton in class.

Black history school meal of fried chicken, watermelon offends many

A student effort to come up with a special menu for Black History Month backfired at Carondelet High School in Concord.

APS cheating scandal as the AJC reported it

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