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Mueller investigation: Paul Manafort, 2 other former Trump campaign staffers charged

President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, and a former business associate, Rick Gates, turned themselves in to federal authorities Monday to face 12 charges in connection to a months-long probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, according to multiple reports.

>> Read more trending news

Manafort and his attorney showed up at the FBI’s Washington field office around 8:15 a.m., The New York Times reported. Gates also turned himself in, The Associated Press reported.

In a 31-page, 12-count indictment approved Friday by a grand jury, federal prosecutors accused Manafort and Gates of conspiring against the United States, conspiring to launder money and working as unregistered foreign agents.

Another former Trump campaign staffer, George Papadopoulos, pleaded guilty earlier this month to lying to FBI agents in the investigation, headed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, officials said Monday.

Mueller investigation: Former Trump campaign adviser George Papadopoulos pleads guilty

George Papadopoulos, who served as a foreign policy adviser for then-candidate Donald Trump before Trump won November’s presidential election, pleaded guilty earlier this month to making false statements to the FBI, according to court records released Monday.

>> Read more trending news

Papadopoulos pleaded guilty on Oct. 5 to lying to federal authorities investigating alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 election and possible ties to Trump campaign officials. Former FBI Director Robert Mueller was named special counsel to head the investigation in May.

Mueller's office released unsealed court records on Monday showing Papadopoulos admitted to misleading FBI agents during interviews on Jan. 27 and Feb. 17 about his contact with people thought to be connected to high-ranking Russian officials.

The case marks the first known guilty plea connected to the Mueller investigation.

>> Related: Mueller investigation: Paul Manafort, 2 other former Trump campaign staffers indicted

Papadopoulos told investigators that he understood that one of the Trump campaign's main foreign policy goals was to improve relations between Washington and Moscow. To that end, he tried several times to set up meetings between Trump campaign and Russian government officials.

He failed to disclose his attempts to authorities, despite inquiries from the FBI.

He admitted that he lied about when he met a London-based professor who claimed that the Russians had "thousands of emails" that amounted to "dirt" on Trump rival Hillary Clinton. He told that he met the professor before joining the presidential campaign in March 2016 and attempted to downplay their communications, telling agents that he believed the professor "was 'BS'ing, to be completely honest."

However, officials determined that the meeting took place in London days after Papadopoulos joined the Trump campaign and that Papadopoulos kept contact with the professor for months. He believed the professor was well-connected in Russian government circles and communicated with him about foreign policy issues in an effort to arrange a “history making” meeting between Trump campaign and Russian government officials, court records show.

He also lied about his contact with an unnamed Russia woman, who he identified in an email as “(Russian President Vladimir) Putin’s niece,” and contact with a person who said he had connections to the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, court records show.

Authorities said Papadopoulos believed the unidentified Russian woman could help him to arrange a possible foreign policy trip to Russia. 

>> Related: Reports: Manafort, former Trump campaign chairman, told to surrender to federal authorities 

Officials indicated that Papadopoulos made moves to bury his ties to the professor and the person connected to the Russian Foreign Ministry when, one day after his second interview with FBI officials, he deactivated a longtime Facebook account that he kept "which contained information about communications he had with the Professor and the Russian MFA Connection," authorities said. He created a new Facebook page a short time later, which did not have the information on it. 

Papadopoulos also switched to a new phone number that same month.

Authorities arrested Papadopoulos at Washington Dulles International Airport on July 27 and has since agreed to cooperate with investigators, according to court records.

Mueller’s investigation continues.

>> Related: What are Paul Manafort and Rick Gates charged with?

Two other Trump campaign advisers, former campaign manager Paul Manafort and his associate Rick Gates, were indicted on a slew of charges Friday, including accusations that they conspired against the United States. Both men turned themselves in to authorities Monday.

Ivana Trump claims she raised Ivanka, Don Jr. and Eric on her own

President Donald Trump’s first wife, Ivana Trump, is claiming that she raised the couple’s children on her own.

During an interview with John Catsimatidis, Trump said she made all the decisions when it came to the couple’s three children, Ivanka, Donald Jr. and Eric.

>> Trump tears into Russia 'dossier,' Hillary Clinton and Uranium One in Twitter spree

“I told Donald, ‘There can only be one chef in the kitchen.’ And it was me. So I made all the decisions about the schooling, after-school activities,” Ivana Trump said during an interview on “The Cats Roundtable.” “I raised them on my own because Donald was always busy and making the deals.”

She added that the future president didn’t know how to connect with his kids until they were in university and able to talk business.

>> On Rare.us: Ivanka Trump comes to her little brother Barron’s defense in the face of online attacks

“He was not the kind of father who would take them to Central Park in the stroller or play games with them. He did not know how to speak the children’s language. He was not able to do it until the kids were in university. He could speak business with them,” Trump said.

>> Reports: First charges filed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller

She continued: “When the kids were 21 years old, I said, ‘Here’s the final product. Now it is your job to continue.’”

The president’s former wife also talked about his presidential ambition years before he ran for office, saying that he wanted to run in the ’90s but that their nasty divorce swayed the public’s opinion of him.

>> Read more trending news

“He was playing with the idea of becoming president, then but then we got the divorce. And that was the scandal. American women — they loved me and hated Donald. So he would never really win. He would never get their vote,” she said. But now that he’s president, she thinks he’s doing a “very good job.”

Trump tears into Russia 'dossier,' Hillary Clinton and Uranium One in Twitter spree

President Donald Trump began his Sunday by laying into his political enemies.

>> Reports: First charges filed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller

On Sunday morning, Trump tweeted about the now-infamous “dossier” prepared by intel group Fusion GPS.

Recently, reports revealed the Clinton campaign was one of the major backers of the dossier.

>> Trump ally Roger Stone suspended from Twitter after profanity-laden rant

Trump also tweeted about the “Uranium Deal" – a reference to reportedly unfounded allegations that Hillary Clinton allowed the sale of uranium to Russian energy agency Rosatom in exchange for a $145 million donation to the Clinton Foundation – as well as Clinton’s email scandal. Fact-checking sites such as Snopes and FactCheck.org have disputed those claims.

>> Read more trending news

“There is so much GUILT by Democrats/Clinton, and now the facts are pouring out,” Trump tweeted. “DO SOMETHING!”

Although the tweets came just days after reports that a grand jury approved the first charges filed in special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation, White House lawyer Ty Cobb told NBC News that Trump's tweets were not "a reaction to anything involving the special counsel, with whom the White House continues to cooperate."

– The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Donald Trump thanks Jimmy Carter for 'nice remarks' about media coverage

President Donald Trump took to Twitter on Saturday morning to thank former President Jimmy Carter for his remarks about “how badly I am treated by the press.”

>> See the tweet here

>> Reports: First charges filed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller

Trump was referring to a recent interview with the New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd that had the Georgia native asserting the “media have been harder on Trump than any other president certainly that I’ve known about.”

>> Trump ally Roger Stone suspended from Twitter after profanity-laden rant

Added Carter: “I think they feel free to claim that Trump is mentally deranged and everything else without hesitation.”

>> Donald Trump slams Michael Moore's Broadway show as 'total bomb'; filmmaker fires back

Also in that interview, the Democrat offered Trump his services to negotiate with North Korea’s leader – an offer the White House formally rebuffed on Friday.

>> Read more trending news

The 93-year-old repeated that he and his wife Rosalynn voted for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders over Hillary Clinton in last year’s Democratic primary. He questioned whether Russia’s attempts to interfere in the election changed “enough votes, or any votes” to matter. And he knocked some of former President Barack Obama’s foreign policy decisions.

Trump ally Roger Stone suspended from Twitter after profanity-laden rant

Longtime President Donald Trump associate Roger Stone was suspended from Twitter on Saturday after lashing out at CNN’s Don Lemon and other members of the press on Friday night, Politico reports.

>> Reports: First charges filed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller

>> Donald Trump slams Michael Moore's Broadway show as 'total bomb'; filmmaker fires back

In what appeared to be a response to CNN’s Friday night report that the first charges have been filed in the Russian election meddling investigation, Stone reportedly tweeted a profanity-laden rant about Lemon, calling for the anchor to be mocked and punished. Stone also hurled inflammatory insults in the direction of Jake Tapper and Ana Navarro, reports said.

>> Read more trending news

“I have been informed that I have been suspended for 3 hours and 12 minutes,” Stone told Fox News in a text message. “While I am uncertain why, sometimes the stark truth offends some people. I’ll be baaaaaak.”

The account was still suspended early Sunday.

>> On Rare.us: The JFK documents are out, and the new wrinkles in history are aplenty

A spokesperson for Twitter indicated that the social media platform has policies prohibiting harassment and abuse, including inciting others to harass or abuse. Stone could face permanent suspension under the company’s guidelines.

Stone, who was interviewed by the House Intelligence Committee in its Russia probe, is a political consultant and longtime informal adviser to Trump and does not work for the White House in any formal capacity.

Donald Trump slams Michael Moore's Broadway show as 'total bomb'; filmmaker fires back

President Donald Trump tweeted on Saturday evening that although what he was about to say was “not at all presidential,” he was compelled to say that “Sloppy Michael Moore” had failed on Broadway.

>> On Rare.us: Don Trump Jr. critiques Michael Moore’s praise of Harvey Weinstein

Trump was referring to documentary filmmaker Michael Moore’s one-man play, “The Terms of My Surrender.”

The play – which Moore talked up in promos asking “Can a Broadway Show Bring Down a Sitting President?” – has completed a 12-week, 88-show run.

>> Reports: First charges filed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller

“While not at all presidential, I must point out that the Sloppy Michael Moore Show on Broadway was a TOTAL BOMB and was forced to close. Sad!” Trump tweeted.

>> See the tweet here

Moore fired back in a series of tweets blasting Trump's presidency.

"You must have my smash hit of a Broadway show confused with your presidency – which IS a total bomb and WILL indeed close early. NOT SAD," he wrote.

>> See the tweets here

Playbill said that while Moore's show was “not a box-office front-runner,” it “did play its fully scheduled run.”

>> Read more trending news

“Moore’s show began performances July 28 at the Belasco Theatre, where it opened officially Aug. 10. It was reported in May – when the show was announced – that it would play a 12-week limited engagement,” Playbill wrote. “While the show was not a box-office front-runner (grossing less than half of its potential most weeks and drawing in a capacity hovering in the mid 70 percentile), it did play its fully scheduled run.”

– The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

JFK Files: 7 things to know from document release

President Donald Trump on Thursday released a bulk of the remaining sealed documents related to the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy, shielding only about 300 remaining files from the public as authorities review whether their release will affect national security.

>> Read more trending news

The documents did not include any bombshell revelations, although they provided further insight into the events surrounding the Nov. 22, 1963 shooting death of Kennedy in Dallas.

Here are eight things to know from the latest batch of released documents:

1. British newspaper got tip about ‘big news’ ahead of assassination

An anonymous tipster warned a British newspaper reporter by phone that “big news” was coming and that the reporter should contact the American Embassy in London just 25 minutes before Kennedy was shot, according to an FBI memo dated Nov. 23, 1963.

The Cambridge News reporter, who informed police of the call after learning of Kennedy’s death, was not identified.

>> Related: 2,800 JFK assassination records released, hundreds more under review

“The caller said only that the Cambridge News reporter should call the American Embassy in London for some big news and then hung up,” said the memo, from FBI Deputy Director James Angleton to the bureau’s Director J. Edgar Hoover.

2. FBI was tipped off one day before Oswald was killed

An unidentified man tipped FBI agents off to a threat against Lee Harvey Oswald’s life one day before he was shot and killed by Jack Ruby, Hoover said in a memo dated Nov. 24, 1963.

“There is nothing further on the Oswald case except that he is dead,” Hoover said in the opening line of the memo.

Hoover said authorities contacted Dallas police after receiving the call, from a calm-sounding man who claimed he was part of a committee organized to kill Oswald.

“We at once notified the Chief of Police and he assured us Oswald would be given sufficient protection,” Hoover said in the memo. “This morning we called the Chief of Police again warning of the possibility of some effort against Oswald, and he again assured us adequate protection would be given. However, this was not done.”

3. Hoover worried that Oswald’s death would leave doubts about his guilt

In the same memo, Hoover worried that Oswald’s abrupt death would leave lingering questions over his guilt.

“The thing I am concerned about, and so is Mr. (Deputy Attorney General Nicholas) Katzenbach, is having something issued so we can convince the public that Oswald is the real assassin,” Hoover wrote.

He discussed the need to find and share concrete evidence against Oswald while also protecting America’s international relations, which could have been damaged by the various threads of the investigation.

4. Group claimed to have evidence that President Lyndon B. Johnson was in the KKK

In a memo dated April 17, 1964, an FBI official wrote about a claim that President Lyndon B. Johnson, who was sworn in after Kennedy’s assassination, had been a member of the Ku Klux Klan.

A confidential informant claimed to have contacted a man who said that he had “documented proof that President Johnson was formerly a member of the Klan in Texas during the early days of his political career.”

The proof was not provided.

5. Cuban ambassador reacted to assassination news with ‘happy delight’

In a document dated Nov. 27, 1963, CIA officials wrote that the Cuban ambassador to Canada and his staff reacted with “happy delight” when they learned of Kennedy’s assassination.

They were ordered by higher-ups in Havana to keep a somber appearance in public.

>> Related: Photos: The life and death of President John F. Kennedy

“When it was announced in Canada that an official requiem high mass would be held (the ambassador) decided that on basis his instructions from Havana he would have to attend although he made it clear that he would not do so if he had any personal choice in the matter,” the CIA document said.

6. Oswald met with a KGB officer connected to sabotage, assassination unit

In a CIA memo dated Nov. 23, 1963, officials wrote about a phone call intercepted a month earlier in Mexico City from Oswald to the Soviet Embassy. According to investigators, Oswald spoke in “broken Russian” and inquired about a “telegram to Washington.”

Officials determined that the call was likely related to getting “Soviet support for a U.S. passport or visa matter.”

During the call, investigators learned Oswald met with Valeriy Vladimirovich Kostikov, the Soviet consul and a known KGB officer, on Sept. 28, 1963.

>> Read the newly released documents on the National Archives website

Kostikov was described as “a case officer in an operation which is evidently sponsored by the KGB’s 13th Department (responsible for sabotage and assassination).”

7. Soviet officials believed Kennedy death was part of ‘ultraright’ conspiracy

Communist Party and Soviet Union officials believed that Kennedy’s vice president was involved in his assassination, according to an FBI report dated Dec. 2, 1966.

In September 1965, a source told the FBI that KGB officials in Moscow ordered agents to “develop all possible information concerning President Lyndon B. Johnson’s character, background, personal friends, family, and from which quarters he derives is support in his position as President of the United States.”

“Our source added that in the instructions from Moscow, it was indicated that ‘now’ the KGB was in possession of data purporting to indicate President Johnson was responsible for the assassination of the late President John F. Kennedy,” the report said.

Authorities didn’t elaborate on what the purported data contained.

10-year-old immigrant with cerebral palsy detained after emergency surgery now with her family

UPDATE Nov. 3: The Associated Press reported Friday that the ACLU has said authorities released the 10-year-old girl to family. 

Original story, Oct. 26:

A 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy who came to the United States from Mexico illegally when she was an infant was detained by Border Patrol agents after undergoing emergency gall bladder surgery in Texas, according to multiple reports.

>> Read more trending news

Leticia Gonzalez, an attorney for Rosa Maria Hernandez, told The Associated Press that the girl has “difficulty understanding exactly what’s taking place” and is closer in development to a child who’s 4 or 5 years old.

Rosa Maria was intercepted Tuesday morning by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents while she and her cousin, a U.S. citizen, were being taken by ambulance from Laredo to Corpus Christi, according to the Corpus Christi Caller-Times. Rosa Maria was traveling to get emergency surgery and, on the way, she passed through an immigration checkpoint in Freer, the newspaper reported.

Family members told the San Antonio Express-News that Border Patrol agents told them Tuesday that Rosa Maria had to either go back to Mexico or face a lengthy detention process. 

Family members declined to take her to Mexico and authorities transferred her to a children’s shelter 150 miles away in San Antonio on Wednesday, according to the Express-News.

Gonzalez told the Caller-Times that she asked authorities to release Rosa Maria to family members who are U.S. citizens, but that they refused. She said doctors suggested in hospital discharge papers that Rosa Maria be released to family members post-surgery.

"At this point, our argument to (immigration officials) is there is a doctor's directive, why aren't you following it?" Gonzalez told the Caller-Times.

Rosa Maria’s mother, Felipa Delacruz, told the newspaper that federal agents waited outside her daughter’s hospital room while she was recovering. Delacruz does not have legal immigration status and is in Laredo, the Caller-Times reported.

In a statement released to The Associated Press, Customs and Border Protection officials stood by their decision to detain Rosa Maria, saying that agents were “committed to enforcing the immigration laws of this nation.”

“Once medically cleared, she will be processed accordingly,” the statement said.

U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-San Antonio, blamed the Trump administration for adopting “callous policies” toward immigrants.

“They’re treating her like a hardened convict,” Castro said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Trump security: Florida city wants $1.1 million in police equipment

Citing the increased security demands that come with President Donald Trump’s frequent visits to neighboring Palm Beach, Mayor Jeri Muoio wants to spend $1.1 million for a pair of special police vehicles and a patrol boat.

>> Read more trending news

Muoio hopes to get $525,000 of the money from the Florida Legislature. Rep. Rick Roth, R-West Palm Beach, will sponsor the city’s appropriations request in Tallahassee.

Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach is across the Intracoastal Waterway from West Palm Beach. Presidential motorcades routinely venture through West Palm Beach along Southern Boulevard and other routes, and West Palm Beach is often the staging area for demonstrations by Trump’s supporters and protesters.

The three items Muoio hopes to add are:

  • A “mass casualty incident response truck” to provide medical supplies such as IV bags, stretchers, trauma dressing, tarps, tourniquets, lights and generators “to treat a large number of victims.” Muoio estimated its cost around $400,000.
  • An “incident command vehicle” with an estimated $500,000 price tag. It would serve as a command post that could be used by federal and local authorities for incidents such as “protests, special events, bomb/SWAT events, natural disaster…or an act of terrorism,” according to a city description. It would replace the city’s current, 14-year-old vehicle, which “lacks capability to effectively interface with body cameras and drone technologies.”
  • A police patrol boat, estimated to cost $200,000. The craft would improve protection during waterfront events, such as Sunfest and the Palm Beach Boat Show, and also increase inspection and protection of bridges to Palm Beach during presidential visits and “thwart threatening attempts to travel to Mar-a-Lago.”

“We really want to make sure that we have all of the equipment we need for our police and fire department should there be a mass casualty (incident), so we can patrol the Intracoastal as necessary, and to be prepared,” Muoio said in a recent interview.

“We’re the place where the protests occur, so we have to make sure that protesters are safe and orderly.”

Roth agreed.

“The city of West Palm Beach and Palm Beach have an undue burden. The federal government needs to help, and they are, and maybe the state needs to help as well,” said Roth, who said he’s looking for someone in the Senate to champion the city’s request in that chamber.

The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office is the lead local law enforcement agency in helping the Secret Service protect the president when he visits.

The federal government recently approved a $1 million reimbursement to local taxpayers for security costs incurred when Trump stayed at Mar-a-Lago as president-elect. More than 95 percent of that money went to the Sheriff’s Office, with $11,355 going to West Palm Beach. The county is still waiting for approval of about $3.5 million in federal funding to cover law enforcement costs during Trump’s seven trips to Mar-a-Lago as president between February and April.

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