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Former Trump campaign aide Rick Gates to plead guilty in Mueller investigation

Rick Gates, a former aide in President Donald Trump's campaign, plans to plead guilty to charges in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, according to multiple reports.

READ MORE: Paul Manafort, Rick Gates face new charges: report | Mueller investigation: Lawyer pleads guilty to lying to investigators in Russia probeWho is Rick Gates and why was he indicted by Robert Mueller?Who is Paul Manafort, the man indicted in Robert Mueller’s Russian investigation?What are Paul Manafort and Rick Gates charged with?MORE

Teachers to Trump: #ArmMeWith funding, supplies and resources, not guns

Teachers around the nation are using the hashtag #ArmMeWith on social media to push for an increase in what they say they really need in schools: funding, mental health resources, school supplies and books, not guns.

The #ArmMeWith movement is a reaction to President Donald Trump’s call for some teachers to carry concealed weapons in schools, even proposing that teachers receive bonuses for helping with security. Trump made the statements following the Parkland, Florida, school shooting last week that claimed the lives of 17 people.

>> Read more trending news 

Some educators, such as Utah teacher Kasey Hansen, said carrying a concealed weapon in school is “more of a solution” than hiding in a corner and waiting if an armed intruder enters the classroom. 

But others, including the president of the 1.7 million-member American Federation of Teachers, Randi Weingarten, called arming teachers a horrible idea and said an educator’s handgun would be no match for the assault-style weapons often wielded by attackers.

“The solution is to ban these military weapons from people who shouldn't have them,” Weingarten said.

Related: Alabama Sen. Doug Jones calls arming teachers ‘the dumbest idea I’ve ever heard’

“Teachers already shoulder a huge burden when it comes to educating properly, due to lack of funding, support and resources and making sure their students are taken care of emotionally,” Brittany Wheaton, an English teacher in Utah, told CNN. “Asking us to now carry the burden of having the responsibility to kill is irreparably damaging, even if we never have to discharge our weapon.”

Wheaton, along with Kansas teacher Olivia Bertels, launched the movement. According to BuzzFeed, the two met through Instagram and have individually developed significant followings on the platform, often sharing snapshots of their classrooms and inspirational messages.

Following the Florida high school shooting, Wheaton reached out to Bertels said it was “time for teachers to demand their voices be heard.”

Here’s a look at the burgeoning social media movement:

What did president Trump say at CPAC? Watch his speech here

President Donald Trump addressed the Conservative Political Action Convention Friday, telling members of the group they would get their border wall, that he thought some teachers should be armed in school and that his administration "has had the most successful first year in the history of the presidency.”

>> Read more trending news

CPAC, hosted by the American Conservative Union, is held annually and is a favorite  gathering for conservative elected officials.

Trump has spoken at CPAC before – at the conferences held in 2011, 2013, 2014 and 2015. He skipped the conference in 2016 while he was campaigning for president. 

Trump engaged with the crowd in the more than 75minute spee-ch. He smiled when the audience chanted, “Lock her up,” in response to a comment about Hillary Clinton.

Here is the president’s speech from CPAC. Trump’s remarks begin at the 41:15 mark.

Police: TN jailer had 3 weapons, 1,500 rounds of ammo in plan to ‘shoot up’ church

Tennessee police acting on a tip last weekend thwarted a correction officer’s apparent plan to “shoot up” the church his estranged wife attended, officials said. 

Daniel Vernon Toler, 35, of Huron, is jailed at the Wayne County Jail on weapons charges, according to Fox 17 News in Nashville. Toler is a jailer at South Central Correctional Center in Clifton.

Police, acting on the tip, approached Toler at work, where he was found to have an AR-15 assault rifle, two additional weapons and 1,500 rounds of ammunition in his vehicle, the news station reported. An AR-15 is the model of weapon used in the Feb. 14 Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School massacre in Parkland, Florida, that killed 17 students and faculty members. 

“This is what didn’t happen in Florida,” Brent Cooper, district attorney for Tennessee’s 22nd Judicial District, told Fox 17. “Law enforcement listened to a tip and a potential tragedy was avoided.”

>> Read more trending news

In a news release shared on Facebook, officials stated that the tip was fielded by the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office, whose investigators passed the information to the Clifton Police Department because that was where Toler was employed. 

Clifton investigators found Toler at work Sunday morning and, upon searching his vehicle, found the AR-15, an assault-style shotgun and a .17-caliber bolt-action rifle. An arrest warrant in the case stated that the AR-15 had a round in the chamber.

There were also multiple extra, loaded magazines for the assault rifle. 

When questioned, Toler told detectives he planned to potentially carry out the shooting when he got off work that evening, the news release said. 

“There were no specifics how it was going to be done, but (Toler) said the report was credible and that the threat would be possibly carried out after he got off work, which would have been Sunday evening,” Doug Kibbey, Clifton city manager, said in the news release.  

Fox 17 reported that the apparent target was Emanuel Baptist Church in Huron. The head of the church’s security team told the news station that Henderson County sheriff’s deputies call him and warned that Toler had threatened to “shoot up a church and kill himself.”

Toler and his wife, who is a member of the church, are divorcing, the news station said. 

Kibbey said in the news release that he has “the best officers in the state.” Cooper also praised Clifton police officers, particularly Investigator Steve Wilson, who handled the Toler case. 

“It is a very good chance that Officer Wilson’s quick, thorough response saved a lot of lives,” Cooper said. 

Kibbey said the quickness of the joint effort by investigators in Henderson County, Clifton and the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, which is assisting in the case, was “paramount” in getting Toler into custody.

“This could have ended in a bad way,” Kibbey said

Michael B. Jordan responds to criticism about him living with his parents

Michael B. Jordan had a quick response for one person on Twitter who criticized his living arrangement.

On a Feb. 6 appearance on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” Jordan said he still lives with his parents.

>> Read more trending news 

“I love my parents, but we have a roommate relationship right now, which is interesting,” Jordan, 31, said. “You get home-cooked meals, but then you also have random trips to the kitchen in the middle of the night. Just the random run-ins that just might be a little uncomfortable from time to time.”

For Jordan, that included his mother seeing him “sometimes shirtless, maybe a little naked.”

Related: Michael B. Jordan reveals what he had to give up for ‘Black Panther’

Mashable reported that the “Black Panther” star replied to a Twitter user who took issue with him living with his parents and his interest in anime, the latter of which has been documented by Nerdist.

“Michael B. Jordan is a 5’9” adult man that loves anime and lives with his parents,” the Twitter user named Chris wrote. “Y’all told me all of those things were unacceptable though.”

“First of all, I’m 6 feet and they live with ME, put some respeck on my name,” Jordan replied.

Jordan also name-dropped some popular anime characters: Goku, from “Dragonball Z,” and Natuto, of the anime series of the same name.

BB&T recovering after 'technical issue' left customers without access to accounts, cash

Millions of BB&T customers were locked out of their accounts Thursday night and Friday morning due to an outage that bank officials said was caused by a "technical issue."

The interruption of services was first reported Thursday night and appeared to last until just before noon Friday.

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“At this time, many of our services are unavailable, including digital banking, Phone24, and ATM. Thank you for your patience as we work diligently to restore your services. We will continue to provide updates here and on http://BBT.com,” officials with the Winston-Salem-based bank wrote Thursday night on Twitter.

WSOCTV tried Friday morning to access a BB&T ATM in uptown Charlotte, but the message “Sorry, this ATM is temporarily offline," was displayed on the screen.

The company's website said many of its other banking services were down as well, including digital banking and Phone24, meaning customers couldn’t pay bills or check their accounts.

The issue appeared to be resolved before noon Friday.

“As our systems being to recover, our ATMs and automated Phone24 service are now available,” BB&T officials said in a statement around 11 a.m. Friday.

During the outage, bank customers were still able to use debit, credit and prepaid cards at places like the grocery store or gas station.

A bank spokesperson told WSOCTV, "We understand this is causing a major inconvenience for clients and our teams are continuing to work diligently to restore those services. We will work with clients who have incurred fees or experienced other challenges and continue to provide updates through our website and social media. At this time, we have no reason to believe this issue is related to cybersecurity."

Police: Man hit woman with pickup after she refused his advances

A man is accused of hitting a woman with his pickup in Texas after she refused his advances toward her, according to an arrest affidavit.

>> Read more trending news

Carlos Amozurrutia, 27, of Round Rock, was charged with accident involving personal injury, a third-degree felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison.

The victim said Amozurrutia was giving her a ride home Sunday when he began making unwanted advances toward her, the affidavit said. It said she told him to stop so he stopped his pickup and pushed her out. She said that when he drove away, he struck her with the truck, the affidavit said. It said police were alerted at 2:26 a.m. Sunday about the incident in the 400 block of Blockhouse Drive.

The victim had an injury on the left side of her face, and also scratches and red marks on her hands and knees, according to the affidavit. The affidavit does not say how the victim and Amozurrutia knew each other.

A witness who also was in the pickup said she got out of the truck with the victim and saw it strike her, the affidavit said.

It also said two other witnesses who were driving by saw the victim struck and knocked to the ground by an open door on the passenger side when the truck pulled away.

It said the two witnesses told police the driver left without offering to help the victim.

Police stopped Amozurrutia at a nearby gas station for an unrelated offense and were able to identify his truck as the one that hit the victim, the affidavit said.

Amozurrutia was released from the Williamson County Jail on Sunday after posting bail set at $75,000.

Kentucky teacher arrested after allegedly snorting crushed pill in class

A Kentucky teacher was arrested Thursday on suspicion of snorting drugs in class, WLEX reported.

>> Read more trending news

Students at Menifee County Elementary/Middle School in Frenchburg told officials they saw Cherish Rednour, 41, crush a pill with a credit card and make a line with the powder. They alleged that after snorting the pill, Rednour slumped over her desk and was having trouble staying awake.

Rednour was confronted by the principal and officials from the Menifee Sheriff''s Office about the allegations. WLEX reported. She was subjected to several field sobriety tests and was arrested shortly after.

Sheriff's officials said they found a white residue on her desk and a credit card with residue. 

When a deputy searched Rednour at the Sheriff's Office, they found a tampon applicator in her bra that "resembled a very small, cut straw," according to arrest records. 

Rednour was charged with public intoxication, controlled substance (excludes alcohol), first-degree possession of controlled substance, and drug paraphernalia, according to arrest records.

National Women's History Month: What is it, when did it begin, who is being honored this year?

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the passage of a law making March Women’s History Month in the United States.

The observation, which was born out of a California school district’s celebration of women’s achievements, now is celebrated across the country, and includes parades, lectures, health screenings, art exhibits and other activities that highlight women’s contributions to society.

>> Read more trending news

Here’s a look at the history of the movement, why it’s celebrated in March, this year’s theme and the National Women’s History Project honorees.

What is it?

Women’s History Month is a celebration of women’s contributions to society.

When is it?

In the United States, it is celebrated each year in March.

Why March?

March was chosen as the month to celebrate women’s history because the first observances of Women’s History Week revolved around International Women’s Day, which is March 8. International Women’s Day, which honors women’s achievements worldwide, was first celebrated on March 8, 1911. The United Nations has sponsored International Women’s Day observances since 1975.

How did it start?

In 1978, a school district in Sonoma, California, decided to honor women’s achievements by participating in a Women’s History Week event. According to the National Women’s History Project, schools hosted essay contests, presentations by women were given at many of the schools in the district and a parade was held in downtown Santa Rosa, California.

The following year, a two-week conference examining women’s history was held at Sarah Lawrence College. Those participating in the conference learned about Sonoma County's Women's History Week celebration and decided to organize similar celebrations within their own schools and organizations.

During the following seven months, they lobbied for a declaration of Women’s History Week and in March 1980, President Jimmy Carter issued a presidential proclamation declaring the week of March 8, 1980, as National Women's History Week.

In 1981, Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and Rep. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., co-sponsored a joint congressional resolution calling the week of March 7, 1982, Women’s History Week.

Schools across the country began to incorporate Women’s History Week into their curriculum and, eventually, the week grew into a monthlong observance.

Fourteen states had declared March Women’s History Month by 1986. In 1987, the National Women’s History Project asked Congress to establish March as Women’s History Month. On March 12, 1987, the celebration became official when legislation was passed to designate March as Woman’s History Month in the United States.

What is this year’s theme?

The 2018 National Women’s History Month theme is “Nevertheless, She Persisted: Honoring Women Who Fight All Forms of Discrimination against Women.”

The theme refers to remarks made by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., after he objected to Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., reading a letter from civil rights leader Coretta Scott King that condemned then-Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala. The Senate was debating Sessions nomination to become U.S. attorney general. McConnell objected to the reading of the letter on the grounds of “Rule XIX” which prohibits ascribing "to another senator or to other senators any conduct or motive unworthy or unbecoming a senator.” He called for a vote to silence Warren, which passed on party lines.

Who is being honored this year?

Here, from the National Women’s History Project, is a list of those being honored this year.

  1. Susan Burton: Burton founded A New Way of Life Re-Entry Project in 1998 to help women break the cycle of incarceration. Burton is a co-founder of All of Us or None and the Formerly Incarcerated and Convicted People’s Movement, both national grassroots civil rights movements comprised of formerly incarcerated individuals, their families and community allies.
  2. Margaret Dunkle: Dunkle played a key role in implementing Title IX, the law that transformed education for women and girls, from athletic fields to graduate schools. Her groundbreaking 1974 report documenting discrimination against female athletes became the blueprint for the Title IX regulations on athletics. Dunkle crafted the 1986 legislation that enabled low-income women to receive student aid without losing health insurance for their children.
  3. Geraldine Ferraro: Ferraro was the first female vice presidential candidate representing a major political party. In 1993 President Clinton appointed Ferraro U.S. ambassador to the United Nations on human rights, and in 1995 appointed her vice chair of the U.S. delegation to the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing.
  4. Jill Moss Greenberg: Greenberg is a lifelong crusader for fairness and the rights of underrepresented groups. She served as the first National Executive Director of NAME (the National Association for Multicultural Education).
  5. Roma Guy: Guy is a social justice activist and policy leader on homelessness, public health, poverty, LGBTQI rights, immigrant rights, and women’s rights. She was a consultant and one of the LGBTQI activists featured in the 2017 ABC miniseries “When We Rise.”
  6. Cristina Jiménez: Jimenez is a leader in the youth-led immigrant rights movement, and instrumental in creating the DACA program. She is executive director and co-founder of United We Dream, the largest immigrant youth-led organization in the country.
  7. Saru Jayaraman: Jayaraman responded to the 9/11 tragedy by organizing displaced World Trade Center workers and co-founding Restaurant Opportunities Centers United. ROC United is a leader in the “One Fair Wage” campaign to end the two-tiered minimum wage system.
  8. Marty Langelan: Langelan is a leader in the global effort to end harassment and gender-based violence. Langelan provides violence-intervention skills training for international human-rights organizations, anti-rape activists, environmentalists and others.
  9. Pat Maginnis: Maginnis is an abortion rights activist. In 1962 Maginnis founded the Society for Humane Abortion where she advocated for “elective abortion” and argued that all women had the right to safe and legal abortion. In 1966, she founded the Association to Repeal Abortion Laws.
  10. Arlene B. Mayerson: Mayerson is a leading attorney in disability rights law. She played a key role in drafting and negotiating the Americans with Disabilities Act and amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
  11. Pauli Murray: Murray was a civil rights and women’s rights activist. She finished first in her class at Howard Law School where she was the only female student. She was denied admission to graduate school in 1938 due to her race and denied a fellowship to Harvard Law in 1944 due to her sex. She went on to be the first African-American awarded a law doctorate from Yale (1965) and later became the first African-American woman to be ordained an Episcopal priest (1977). President John F. Kennedy appointed her to the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women (1961) and she was a co-founder of the National Organization for Women in 1966.
  12. Elizabeth Peratrovich: Peratrovich, an Alaska native of the Tlingit Nation, was a civil rights leader. She petitioned Alaska officials to end segregation of native peoples. She was instrumental in the Feb. 16, 1945, anti-discrimination act to protect the civil rights of Alaska natives.
  13. Loretta Ross: Ross has dedicated her career to feminist issues with a focus on women of color. She helped create the theory of reproductive justice, adding a human rights framework to include everyone in reproductive rights issues. She is a visiting professor teaching courses on white supremacy, reproductive justice, and calling in practices at Hampshire College for the 2017-2018 academic year. 
  14. Angelia Salas: Salas is a key strategist and leader in the national movement for immigrant rights and policy reform. She is the executive director of the Center for Humane Immigrant Rights.
  15. Linda Spoonster Schwartz: Schwartz overcame a military injury to become one of the nation’s leading veterans’ advocates, focusing especially on the unmet needs of women veterans. She was chair of the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Advisory Committee on Women Veterans, served as Connecticut commissioner/commandant of veterans affairs, was nominated by President Barack Obama to be assistant secretary of veteran affairs for policy and planning. She is the first and only woman elected president of the National Association of State Directors of Veterans Affairs.

Trump to speak at CPAC: What time, what channel, who else is speaking?

President Donald Trump is scheduled to address an audience at the Conservative Political Action Conference Friday.

Trump is set to begin speaking around 10:05 a.m. ET at the gathering of conservative activists being held at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center near Washington, D.C.

>> Read more trending news

CPAC, hosted by the American Conservative Union, is held annually.

Trump has spoken at CPAC before – at the conferences held in 2011, 2013, 2014 and 2015. He skipped the conference in 2016 while he was campaigning for president. 

Click here to read his speech from 2017.

Trump’s speech will be carried live by cable news networks. CPAC is being broadcast on CSPAN and CSPAN 2.

Here is the schedule of speakers for those following Trump on Friday:

  • 11:55 a.m. – White House counselor Kellyanne Conway; Small Business Administration Administer Linda McMahon
  • 12:30 p.m. – Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai
  • 1:35 p.m. – Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel
  • 2:00 p.m. – Gov. Matt Bevin, R-Ky.; Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C.
  • 3:35 p.m. – British politician Nigel Farage

The full CPAC agenda can be found here

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