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Ohio woman charged with felony animal cruelty after one dog decapitated, others starved

A Middletown woman has been jailed and charged with felony animal cruelty after several dead dogs were found in her backyard, according to the Butler County Sheriff’s Office.

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The county dog warden’s office received information last week advising that there were dead dogs in the yard at the residence in the 1300 block of Oxford State Road.

Four dogs were observed by the humane officers when they arrived on Friday. Two of the dogs were found in doghouses, another one was found in a black plastic tote along with a decapitated dog’s head, according to the Sheriff’s Office. The owner, Tina Marie Jackson, said she ran out of dog food and she never provided bedding in the doghouses to keep the dogs warm. She did not offer an explanation for the decapitated dog.

Necropsies were conducted on all four dogs, and three were found to have no food in their stomachs, and the cause of death was ruled starvation. There could not be any determination on a cause of death for the dog with the severed head due to lack of evidence in the specimen.

“I am beside myself,” said Sheriff Richard Jones. “Owning one animal and treating it like trash is appalling but this woman had four. I am disgusted that these poor animals suffered and I am glad Ms. Jackson is behind bars.”

Jackson, 39, was arrested and charged with three counts of felony animal cruelty to companion animals. She is currently housed in Middletown City Jail in lieu of $5,000 bond. Jackson is scheduled to be back in court Monday for a preliminary hearing.

Florida sheriff details proposal to arm teachers, school employees

In the wake of the Parkland school shooting, Volusia County Sheriff Mike Chitwood wants certain teachers to be secretly armed with concealed weapons. 

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“The day of waiting for Tallahassee or Washington, D.C., to protect our kids is not coming,” he said

Chitwood provided more details on how this would work, saying it would be an extension of a program that’s been tested for the past year in Polk County. 

“That’s the only way you’re going to stop these guys, because they’re going to kill themselves,” Chitwood said. 

It would be modeled after the so-called Sentinel program. Candidates would become special deputies, who are screened and trained by officials with the sheriff’s office to stop any threat on campus. 

The Volusia County school superintendent said that is a conversation that needs to be had with the community and the school board. 

None of the five school board members returned requests for comment -- but parents in Ormond Beach had plenty to say. 

“If they’re armed, teachers might not go into the school,” said Brianna Clark, a parent. 

Anne Graham Lotz on her father Billy Graham’s death: ‘Daddy is home’

Billy Graham’s daughter, Anne Graham Lotz, posted a statement about her father's death Wednesday morning. 

The famed American Christian evangelist died at his home in Montreat, North Carolina. He was 99 years old.

>> Read more trending news 

Lotz is one of Graham’s five children with his wife Ruth Bell Graham, who died June 14, 2007.

“For years, over his head as he preached was the banner that quoted the words of Jesus: I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life. Jesus completed that sentence by saying that no one comes to the Father but by Me. Based on what Jesus said, Daddy is safely with the Father. In Heaven,” Lotz  said in a statement posted on her Facebook page.

Read Lotz’s full statement below:

“My Father’s legacy is one that encompasses the world…and engulfs my own life. When I think of him, I don’t think of Billy Graham, the public figure. I think of my Daddy. The one who was always a farmer at heart. Who loved his dogs and his cat. Who followed the weather patterns almost as closely as he did world events. Who wore old blue jeans, comfortable sweaters, and a baseball cap. Who loved lukewarm coffee, sweet ice tea, one scoop of ice cream, and a plain hamburger from McDonald’s. Who was interested in everything and everyone, from the small to the great. Whose mind remembered details that even a computer would have trouble recalling. “But when I think of him I also think of his message because he was immersed in it. Saturated in it. He was his message…a simple man who had responded to God’s love by placing his faith in Jesus, receiving the assurance that his sins were forgiven, that he would not perish, but would have everlasting life. Simple faith. Faith that now matters more than anything else. “For years, over his head as he preached was the banner that quoted the words of Jesus: I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life. Jesus completed that sentence by saying that no one comes to the Father but by Me. Based on what Jesus said, Daddy is safely with the Father. In Heaven. Daddy not only claimed Jesus as the only Way to God, he lived by the Truth publicly on platforms and privately behind closed doors, and is now enjoying real Life. “I have often stated that I was raised by a single parent because ministry took my father away from our family—for weeks and months at a time. Daddy estimated that he was gone from home approximately 60 percent of his children’s growing-up years. Now, he has left again. This time, he will not be coming back. At least, not until Jesus does, too. “While he may be physically absent and his voice silent, I am confident that his message will continue to reverberate throughout the generations to come. My prayer on this day of his move to Our Father’s House is that his death will be a rallying cry. That tens of thousands of pastors, teachers, evangelists, and ordinary men and women will rise up to take his place. That they will take up his message like a baton being passed in a relay race and faithfully pass it on to those with whom they come in contact. Because Daddy’s message is God’s message. And it’s a message of genuine hope for the future, of love for the present, of forgiveness for the past. “It’s a message, when received, that brings a fresh beginning, unshakable joy, unexplainable peace, eternal significance, meaning and purpose to life, and opens Heaven’s door. “It was this message, which Daddy carried to the world, that penetrated my own heart as a young girl and has created in me a personal, passionate resolve to communicate it myself to as many people as possible. And so, even as my tears seem to be unending, I silently rededicate my life to picking up and passing on the baton. Would you do the same?”

Parkland students march at Capitol calling for tighter gun control laws

About 100 students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School poured into the state Capitol this morning to call for tighter gun control laws in the wake of last week’s massacre on their school campus.

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The students arrived at a Tallahassee high school to extended applause late Tuesday after a 400-mile trip on three buses, The Associated Press reported.

The students told about 500 students and parents waiting for them that they are fighting to protect all students.>>Read the full story here.

Paul Manafort, Rick Gates face new charges: report

Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump's former campaign manager, and Rick Gates, who served as a campaign aide, are facing new charges in special counsel Robert Mueller's criminal case against the pair, Politico reported Wednesday.

READ MORE: Mueller investigation: Lawyer pleads guilty to lying to investigators in Russia probeWho is Rick Gates and why was he indicted by Robert Mueller? | Who is Paul Manafort, the man indicted in Robert Mueller’s Russian investigation? | What are Paul Manafort and Rick Gates charged with? | MORE

4 things to know about Billy Graham

Evangelical leader Billy Graham, who counseled presidents and preached to millions of people worldwide, died Wednesday at 99. 

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How Graham got his start

Graham, the son of a North Carolina farmer, started preaching throughout the south and midwest.

He was “born again” after hearing a preacher’s service in 1934 in Charlotte, North Carolina, according to CNN

He attended Florida Bible Institute and it was there while taking a midnight stroll in 1937 on the 18th green when he received his calling from God, Graham wrote in his biography. He was baptized Dec. 4, 1938, in Silver Lake, Florida, and ordained the following year, according to CNN.

After graduating, Graham moved to Illinois to continue his education at Wheaton College, where he met his wife, according to The New York Times.

Advisor to presidents and welcomed by world leaders

Graham advised 10 presidents starting with Harry Truman. Barack Obama was the last president Graham met with, according to the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association

Graham was most closely linked to President Richard Nixon whom he endorsed in 1968. Years later, recordings of the two were released in which they made anti-Semitic remarks. Graham apologized, saying he did not recall making the statements.

Not only did Graham counsel American presidents, world leaders of religiously restrictive countries welcomed him. 

He was invited to preach in China as well as in Pyongyang by North Korean dictator Kim Il-sung, according to the New York Times. He also visited communist countries in Eastern Europe to promote peace.

Graham’s global reach 

Graham was not the first evangelical but he was able to use communication and technology to gain an unprecedented reach. 

Through the use of radio, books, magazines, television and the internet Graham’s “crusades” reached more than 200 million people on almost every continent. 

Graham wrote 30 books and his sermons were translated into 48 languages and sent to 185 countries by satellite, according to the New York Times

He held a crusade in Madison Square Garden in 1957. It was so popular, it was extended from six to 16 weeks and ended with a rally with 100,000 people in Times Square. It was Graham’s longest revival meeting ever.

His final crusade was in 2005 in New York City. However, the Billy Graham Evangelical Association continues to organize them. 

Evangelical “tree”

Graham formed the Billy Graham Evangelical Association in 1950. The group continues to organize crusades, radio and television programs and publishes the Decision magazine. The association trains thousands of evangelicals and missionaries and sends a rapid response team to help in disaster areas. 

His son, Franklin Graham, who developed his own following, was tapped to lead the association in 1995, according to the New York Times

Daughter Anne Graham Lotz and grandsons Will Graham and William Graham Tullian Tchividjian are part of the ministry. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Celebrities, politicians react to Billy Graham’s death

Celebrities and politicians are reacting to the news of the death of Rev. Bill Graham.

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Known around the world, the evangelist preached to millions of people into his mid-90s. He died at his Montreat, North Carolina, home Wednesday at 99 years old. He had been battling cancer, pneumonia and a number of other health aliments.

>> Live coverage at WSOCTV.com

Graham was frequently seen among U.S. presidents -- a dozen of whom he worked with as a spiritual counselor.

Related: Photos: Billy Graham was counselor to presidents

Public figures responded to the news of Graham’s death on Twitter.

Billy Graham-Richard Nixon tapes: The one time Graham’s image was tarnished

As Americans mourn the death of evangelist Billy Graham, you would be hard-pressed to find a time where “America’s Pastor” was held in anything other than the highest regard. Graham managed during 60 years of preaching the Gospel to sidestep even a hint of scandal -- sexual, financial or otherwise. However a revelation in 1994 of a conversation he had with then-President Richard Nixon turned out to be a source of embarrassment for Graham – not at the time it was disclosed by Nixon Chief of Staff H.R. Haldeman, but years later when a tape of the conversation was released by the National Archives.>> Read more trending news

At first, Graham denied comments Haldeman made in his book, "The Haldeman Diaries" that Graham and Nixon had disparaged Jews in a conversation following a prayer breakfast in Washington D.C. on Feb. 1, 1972. Haldeman said Graham had talked about a Jewish “stranglehold” on the country. ''Those are not my words," Graham said in May 1994. ''I have never talked publicly or privately about the Jewish people, including conversations with President Nixon, except in the most positive terms.'' Graham was believed and the matter dropped until 2002 when tapes from Nixon’s White House were released by the National Archives. The 1972 conversation between Nixon and Graham was among those tapes, and Graham had to face the fact that he had been recorded saying the things of which Haldeman accused him. The tapes proved damning. ''They're the ones putting out the pornographic stuff,'' Graham had said to Nixon. The Jewish ''stranglehold has got to be broken or the country's going down the drain,'' he continued. Graham told Nixon that Jews did not know his true feelings about them.  ''I go and I keep friends with Mr. Rosenthal (A.M. Rosenthal) at The New York Times and people of that sort, you know. And all -- I mean, not all the Jews, but a lot of the Jews are great friends of mine, they swarm around me and are friendly to me because they know that I'm friendly with Israel. But they don't know how I really feel about what they are doing to this country. And I have no power, no way to handle them, but I would stand up if under proper circumstances.'' Rosenthal was the Times' executive editor. After the release of the tapes, Graham was horrified, according to Grant Wacker, a Duke Divinity School professor who wrote a book about Graham. He publicly apologized and asked for forgiveness from Jewish leaders in the country. "He did not spin it. He did not try to justify it," Wacker told NPR. "He said repeatedly he had done wrong, and he was sorry." ''I don't ever recall having those feelings about any group, especially the Jews, and I certainly do not have them now,'' Graham said in 2002 when the tape was released. ''My remarks did not reflect my love for the Jewish people. I humbly ask the Jewish community to reflect on my actions on behalf of Jews over the years that contradict my words in the Oval Office that day.''

Photos: Billy Graham was counselor to presidents

Billy Graham worked as a spiritual counselor to numerous U.S. presidents. Here are photos of the late reverend with some of them.

Photos: Billy Graham through the years

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