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Mom says baby overheated as United Airlines plane sat on tarmac for 2 hours

2017 is not a good year to be an airline company, especially if that company’s name is United Airlines. 

Passenger and mom Emily France said her baby became overheated recently on a delayed flight as the aircraft waited on the Denver International Airport (DIA) tarmac, reports the Denver Post. The 39-year-old said that passengers waited for more than two hours on the plane despite a heat wave in the area. France recalled “hot air coming from the vents.”

>> Read more trending news

“We just sat and sat and sat,” she said. “I hit my call button and said, ‘I think it’s getting dangerously hot back here.'”

France also said that despite requesting an ambulance, she had to wait for 30 minutes before she was allowed to leave the plane with her son, Owen.

“They couldn’t evacuate us. It was chaos. I really thought my son was going to die in my arms,” France said as she criticized the airline for not being prepared to handle her situation.

>> Man forcibly removed from flight after not voluntarily giving up seat

Owen was treated at a children’s hospital after the incident. Doctors said he suffered from the heat but thankfully remained unaffected by heat-related medical conditions.

DIA spokesman Heath Montgomery corroborated the call for an ambulance.

A representative for United emailed the following statement to the Denver Post:

"Yesterday, a child onboard flight 4644 at Denver International Airport experienced a medical issue while the aircraft was taxiing prior to takeoff. The pilot returned to the gate as our crew called for paramedics to meet the aircraft. Our thoughts are with the child and family, and we have been in contact to offer travel assistance."

Read more here.

Congress introduces bill to prevent hot car deaths

New legislation on Capitol Hill aims to equip cars with technology that could help save the lives of children.

>> Read more trending news 

More than 800 children have died from heatstroke in hot cars since 1990, according to Kidsandcars.org.

A bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced the Hot Car Act this week.

“Our legislation would move us one step closer to getting this inexpensive technology in every car on the road to help save the lives of children nationwide,” said U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, R-Ohio.

Parents and families who have been affected by hot car deaths and safety advocates joined members of Congress to push the bill.The bill would require cars to visually alert drivers to check rear seating once the car has been turned off.

The alert must also include a noise to remind the driver to check the back seat.

The alert system could also include a vibration system to physically alert the driver.

The technology would be similar to the alert a car gives when keys are left in the car or the headlights are still on.

The bill would also educate the public on the risks of leaving a child unattended in a car after it has been turned off.

Nine children have died so far this year from being left in a back seat. 

Longest Uber drives: Ride from DFW to Nashville totals 11.5 hours, 650 miles

An Uber driver might have earned nearly $1,000 with one drive.

>> Read more trending news 

Brent Pfieffer received a notification on his cellphone on Sunday night about passengers requesting a pickup at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. 

Soon after accepting the request, Pfieffer got a phone call from one of the customers.

“They said, ‘I have an issue here. I need these people delivered to Nashville, Tennessee,’” Pfieffer told WFAA.

The customers were travelers from China who had arrived in Texas on Sunday morning. Their connecting flight to Nashville had been delayed multiple times before it was finally canceled.

“The next flight they could get on wasn’t until Monday afternoon,” Pfieffer told WFAA. “And they had a business meeting at noon Monday they had to be at.”

The passengers piled into Pfieffer’s SUV, and the group rode 11.5 hours to Nashville, covering 650 miles.

“We had a few stops on the way,” Pfieffer said. “They spoke enough broken English [so] we could converse. They were in a good mood. They were upset they didn't have their bags and didn't get the flight, but other than that it was a fun ride.” 

Pfieffer said Uber still hasn’t processed the fare but he estimates he’ll receive about $800 from the ride after Uber claims its share of the fare. He also negotiated gas expenses with the customers.

The ride is believed to be one of the longest Uber drives completed.

Read more at WFAA.

10 ways to save money on gasoline during your summer travels

With the summertime driving season here, gas consumption is at a premium.

>> Related: 10 road trip hacks every traveler needs to know

Here are 10 tips on keeping your gas costs low:

1. Don’t overfill

As tempting as it is to fill your tank right to the brim, try and refrain. Overfilling results in gas sloshing over and running down the side of your car. That’s bad for your paint job, the environment and your wallet.

Once the nozzle clicks the first time, stop there.

2. Low-octane is OK

Unless you’re driving a car that specifically requires it -- which should be noted in the owner’s manual -- there’s no need to fill up with pricey high-octane fuel.

Buy the lowest octane that’s appropriate for your vehicle to save on money.

3. Tighten your gas cap

A loose gas cap will allow gas to evaporate from your car along with the cash you just filled up with.

Gas caps are part of your car’s Evaporative Emission System (EVAP). Loose, missing or damaged gas caps mean your EVAP system isn’t working, which allows for gas evaporation.

>> Read more trending news

4. Tune up your car

If your car is out of tune, or has failed an emissions test, getting it tuned up will boost gas mileage.

A key point to look for in a tune-up is worn spark plugs. A misfiring spark plug can dramatically reduce a car’s fuel efficiency.

5. Find credit card discounts

Some credit cards will give you savings on gas when you use their card for purchases. It’s a similar program to airline-linked credit cards that give you frequent flier miles.

PenFed, Chase and Discover are three of the companies that have some of the best promotions.

>> Related: Nothing will ruin a vacation faster than these 5 common money mistakes — here’s how to avoid them

6. Belong to the club

Some gas stations have their own membership groups or they are tied in to area department and grocery store chains. Using these store memberships can save you serious money at the pump.

7. Don’t bother with the brand names

Does your locally owned and operated corner store have gas pumps? They get the same gas as the shiny brand-name gas station that’s on every corner. They’re using the same refineries, trucks and pipelines. If your local store has better prices, buy there.

8. Get away from the highway

The highest prices on gas are usually at highway rest areas or at gas stations just off the exit ramp. These stations are feeding on that traffic, and charging higher prices as a result.

If you can get off the highway and get into town at least a few blocks, you’ll find less expensive gas prices.

9. If you’re in the city, stay local

While a penny-pincher might crow with success at driving across town to find gas that’s a nickel cheaper, in reality all the miles you’ll drive will more than likely negate your savings. Stop-and-go traffic does not do good things for fuel efficiency or greenhouse gas emissions.

10. Keep a log

If you’re taking a summer trip, keep a journal of the “mileage wins” and “mileage losses” of your trip.

For example, you could note: “Drove to the restaurant downtown only to find they had a two-hour wait. Should have made a reservation.” Or “Headed to the ballpark at 4:30 only to be stuck in traffic for 90 minutes and couldn’t find parking for another 45. Should have used mass transit.”

WATCH: Highway severely damaged after tanker truck explodes

A busy stretch of Interstate 25 in Denver was severely damaged after a tanker truck caught fire and exploded Wednesday. The driver of the truck suffered injuries, but was pulled from the truck by passing motorists and workers.

>> Click here to watch

Firefighters responded to Interstate 25 in southern Denver around noon local time after the semi caught fire, CBS affiliate KCNC-TV reports

>> WATCH: Massive fire erupts on I-75 after deadly Ohio gas tanker crash

The station reports a preliminary investigation found a blown tire on the semi sparked the blaze, causing the tanker to explode, but an official cause was not released. 

 >> RELATED: Viewers capture Dayton, Ohio, I-75 crash, fire, explosion

A witness told KCNC-TV he saw the semi lose control and hit a barrier just before the fire started.

“When he came to a stop I could see fuel, on the road northbound,” said Dave Fretz, a witness to the incident. “It was smoking and there was some flames happening in the back part of it. I knew this guy was in a truck and I didn’t see him come out of the truck.”

 >> VIDEO: DOT camera captures Ohio I-75 crash, explosion

>> PHOTOS: Images from fiery wrong-way crash on I-75 in Ohio

Fretz told the station while he went to check on the driver’s side of the semi, two Colorado Department of Transportation workers had pulled the driver from the passenger’s side and were helping him away from the fire.

Fretz said the driver was suffering from head and arm injuries, but the official condition of the driver was unavailable. 

All 10 lanes of the highway, five in each direction, were shut down for several hours for crews to extinguish the blaze, forcing over 200,000 daily commuters to be diverted around the scene. By the Wednesday evening commute, three lanes were open on the southbound side of Interstate 25, but the northbound lanes remained closed into Thursday morning. 

>> Large fire leads to I-85 collapse in Atlanta

KCNC-TV reports the Colorado Department of Transportation will work overnight with hopes to reopen the remaining lanes by the Thursday morning commute. 

CDOT workers said damage to the highway on the southbound lanes went about three inches deep into the pavement, but crews had yet to evaluate the extent of damage to the northbound lanes. 

>> Read more trending news

Officials said they will need to remove the toxic mixture of chemicals, foam, and water still in the roadway before repairs could be made. 

Orlando airport standoff: Mother with children feared she'd be shot in the back

Operations at Florida's Orlando International Airport resumed as normal Wednesday morning, hours after the end of a standoff involving a 26-year-old man holding a fake gun, the Orlando Police Department said.

>> Watch the news report here

Michael Wayne Pettigrew was undergoing a psychological evaluation following the two-hour standoff during which he threatened to harm himself and pointed a fake gun at officers at a rental car area on the airport's ground floor, Orlando police Chief John Mina said.

>> Read more trending news

Police said that shortly before 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, they received a report that there was an armed man at the airport.

>> On WFTV.com: Watch: Passengers describe standoff at Orlando International Airport

"Our negotiators did a phenomenal job talking with the subject for about two hours and finally got him to peacefully surrender," Mina said.

The suspect surrendered at about 10 p.m.

Crystal Oliphant said she was picking up her husband from the airport Tuesday night.

>> On WFTV.com: Watch: Orlando police Chief John Mina news conference on OIA standoff

"(We were) terrified," she said. "Immediately, we think that there's a bomb or that there's a shooting going on. And we're not getting any information. And there's hundreds of police (officers) just coming in."

Passengers and employees bolted once they realized what was happening.

Witness Kim Turner told WFTV that she saw the suspect dressed in black but she couldn't make out his face because she was hiding with her two children.

>> On WFTV.com: Photos: Standoff at Orlando International Airport

Turner waited for an opportunity to run to safety, and when she did, she said she saw the suspect point what appeared to be a gun at his own head.

Although the gun was fake, it seemed very real to Turner.

"I actually had a thought of me getting shot in the back," she said. "I was standing here, literally just sitting here, looking at him, waiting, because everybody else is gone."

No one was injured in the incident.

The Golden Gate Bridge turns 80

The Golden Gate Bridge marks its 80th year Saturday. 

The iconic bridge opened to pedestrians on May 27, 1937, and opened to vehicular traffic the next day.

>> Read more trending news

The Golden Gate Bridge, which took over four years to construct, was an engineering marvel of its time. The bridge continues to be one of the country's most recognizable landmarks.

Taking Uber or Lyft? Read these 7 safety tips before getting in the car

City dwellers, students, travelers and citizens without vehicles of their own often rely on ride-hailing services such as Uber or Lyft to get from one place to the next.

>> Read more trending news 

But with all the news stories involving imposter drivers, driver-involved assaults and violent altercations, passengers should take some precautions before getting into the vehicle.

» Related: Is Uber safe? People questioning after reports of recent assaults 

Here are some safety tips for passengers when using a rideshare service:

Confirm the name of the driver and make of the vehicle.

There have been several cases of people posing as drivers, but both Uber and Lyft offer passengers details such as the driver’s name, their photo and car type.

According to Campbell Matthews, a Lyft representative, the company also offers an “amplified” way to identify your driver.

Lyft drivers have a bright, color-changing pill-shaped device (called the Amp) made of multiple LED lights on their dashboards.

The color in your Lyft app will match the color of the Amp in your driver’s car. 

Before getting in the car, make sure you’re getting in the right one.

» Related: Uber driver charged with assault on pregnant passenger 

Check the driver’s rating.

Just like you’re less likely to sign a lease on an apartment known for its low management or maintenance ratings and reviews, rideshare ratings can be used to determine the quality and safety of your ride.

Rideshare apps give passengers their potential driver’s ratings ahead of the car’s arrival, so if you’re uncomfortable with the rating, cancel your ride and call another.

Share your trip details with friends or family.

According to Uber, you’re able to tap “Share status” in the mobile app and share your driver’s name, photo, license plate and location with a friend or family member.

They can then track your trip without downloading the Uber app.

» Related: Uber plans to take ride-sharing off the ground 

Lyft users can tap the “Send ETA” icon on the bottom bar, which will send a text message to family or friends with a link to your current route and location.

If your ride-hailing service doesn’t offer a quick status or ETA share, snap a photo of the vehicle’s license plate and send the photo (and any additional details) to a family member or friend.

Avoid riding in the front seat.

Passengers (especially women) who ride up front have been on the receiving end of assaults, groping and other aggressive, unwanted behavior, according to Taxicab, Limousine and Paratransit Association spokesman Dave Sutton.

» Cops: Fake Uber driver sexually assaulted woman leaving Buckhead bar 

Follow along in your own maps app.

Open up your own maps tool, enter your destination and follow along, noting any odd route shifts.

Travel in groups when possible.

There’s often safety in numbers. Try riding with a friend or two or consider using the carpool option some ride-hailing services offer (Uber Pool, Lyft Line).

Trust your gut.

If you have an inkling of discomfort or sense something fishy, don’t get in the car. If you’re already on the road and are in an emergency situation, call 911 immediately.

Sticky situation: Truck dumps hundreds of watermelons on I-85 near Atlanta

Hundreds of watermelons are ruined, but a busy freeway ramp near metro Atlanta has reopened.

According to the WSB 24-hour Traffic Center, a truck overturned Thursday morning, dumping watermelons on the ramp from I-85 North to I-985 North in Georgia’s Gwinnett County and causing traffic headaches for nearly two hours.

>> Read more trending news

Details about the crash have not been released.

Georgia Department of Transportation crews cleaned up the mess and reopened the ramp just after 8 a.m., the Traffic Center reported.

Plane carrying 4 disappears over Bermuda Triangle; debris found

Members of the Coast Guard have located debris they believe belongs to a plane that was carrying a New Hampshire man and three others, including two children.

>> Watch the news report here

Nathan Ulrich from Lee, New Hampshire, was listed as the pilot for the plane, which was flying from Puerto Rico to Titusville, Florida, on Monday morning when it disappeared.

A businesswoman from New York, Jennifer Blumin, and her two young sons were passengers on the plane. Blumin was listed as the owner of the plane.

Ulrich is an engineer and the co-founder of a company that makes adult scooters. His ex-wife, actor Rae Dawn Chong, tweeted about what was happening Tuesday.

Ulrich's father, Gael, issued the following statement to WFXT:

"We were devastated and shocked to learn that Nathan, Jennifer and her children have been missing since leaving from Puerto Rico on Monday. Nathan is our beloved son, brother and uncle and we wish for resolution as the Coast Guard search continues. Our prayers and thoughts are with the Blumin family and James Ramsey in this difficult time.

>> Read more trending news

"We appreciate the respect for our privacy as we deal with the situation together with our family and prefer no further press contact. We appreciate the kind wishes and thoughts of those who have reached out to us."

The Coast Guard said it believes the debris is from the missing plane flown by Ulrich.

"Some of the helicopters that found the debris field yesterday, they were able to recover some components from the debris that we sent to the aircraft mechanic who confirmed they are from the same type of airplane as the missing airplane," Eric Woodall from the USCG said.

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