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British toddler Alfie Evans, at center of legal battle, dies

Alfie Evans, the 23-month-old boy who was at the center of a legal battle in the United Kingdom, died Saturday, the BBC reported.

>> Read more trending news

The parents of Alfie, who had a degenerative brain condition, lost legal challenges that allowed the hospital to take the boy off life support on Monday.

Thomas Evans, the boy’s father, wrote on Facebook that “My gladiator lay down his shield and gained his wings. … absolutely heartbroken.”

Evans and Alfie's mother, Kate James, clashed with doctors over the child’s treatment, the BBC reported.

Alfie was first admitted to Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool in December 2016 after suffering seizures. His parents wanted to fly the toddler to a hospital in Italy, but their request was rejected by doctors who said continuing treatment was “not in Alfie's best interests,” the BBC reported.

The hospital said scans showed “catastrophic degradation of his brain tissue” and that further treatment was futile and also “unkind and inhumane.”

Alfie’s parents fought the hospital’s medical staff in court for four months, but lost when the High Court ruled in favor of the hospital on Feb. 20. The decision was upheld on appeal.

Alfie was granted Italian citizenship Monday, but judges upheld a ruling preventing the boy from traveling abroad after his life support was withdrawn, the BBC reported.

Thousands of balloons were released in his memory.

North Korea: What you should know about the country and its people

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has made abrupt overtures toward peace this year, offering to meet with President Donald Trump and pledging to end nuclear weapons testing in a bid to reduce military tensions on the Korean peninsula.

Here is a primer on North Korea, its leader and its people.

The name: North Korea -- or formally, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea -- borders China, Russia and South Korea.

Population: 25,115,311 (estimated as of July 2016)

Area: North Korea is a little bigger than Virginia, with 46,000 square miles.

Capital: The capital city is Pyongyang. An interesting fact: Pyongyang runs on its own time zone. It’s about 30 minutes behind Japan and South Korea.

No ties: North Korea does not have diplomatic representation in the United States, nor does the U.S. have diplomatic representation in North Korea.

Median age: North Korea’s median age is estimated to be 33.8 years.

GNP: The gross domestic product, per capita, is $1,800. In the U.S., it’s $51,638.10

Leaders: North Korea is led by Kim Jong-un. Since 1945, the country has been led by three generations of the same family: Kim Il-Sung, in 1945; then his son, Kim Jong-Il, upon his father’s death in 1994; then the current leader, Kim Jong-un, upon his father’s death in 2011.

Why are there two Koreas?From 1910 until the end of World War II, Japan controlled the Korean Peninsula. After the Japanese lost the war, the U.S. occupied the southern half of the peninsula and the Russians occupied the north half. 

In 1945, Kim Il-Sung became the country’s first leader. In 1948, separate governments -- one in the north and one in the south -- formed after regional differences went unresolved.

On June 25, 1950, North Korea invaded South Korea. The United Nations intervened with troops, and the “police action” (another name for a war), continued until 1953. 

After a peace treaty was brokered, the country broke into two countries. South Korea becomes a prosperous capitalist nation, while North Korea remains a poor country.

Why are tensions high now?

North Korea’s leader is considered unstable and his regime is a brutal one. It is believed that North Korea spends between one-quarter and one-third of its GDP on the military and weapons development in a country where nearly 2 million people starved to death in the 1990s. 

A series of nuclear weapons tests by North Korea has world leaders on edge. 

Can North Korea attack nearby countries with nuclear weapons?They can now if they have indeed created a warhead small enough to be delivered on a missile that is fired at an enemy. North Korea says it has done that, but there has been no verification of that by the U.N. or other countries.

Interesting facts about the country

  • USA Today reports that North Koreans born after the Korean War tend to be shorter than South Koreans of the same age. About 2 inches shorter, in fact. 
  • According to The Chosun Ilbo, men are encouraged to copy the hairstyle of the country’s leader, Kim Jong-un. No long hair. Women should copy the style of his wife, he reportedly said.
  • North Korea claims it has a 100 percent literacy rate for both men and women, according to the CIA World Factbook.
  • Only 3 percent of the roads in North Korea are paved. (CIA World Factbook.)
  • You cannot become a citizen of North Korea unless one of your parents is a citizen. (CIA World Factbook.)
  • The last election was held in the country on March 9, 2014. Kim Jong-un won 100 percent of the vote. The next one is scheduled for March 2019.

Cameraman catches Prince William nodding off during service

It’s tough to be a dad of a newborn again. Just ask Prince William.

>> Read more trending news

The Duke of Cambridge was caught on camera apparently nodding off during the Anzac memorial services Wednesday at Westiminster Abbey, Cosmopolitan reported.

William was shown struggling to stay awake as he sat next to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. The fact that the speaker was droning on probably contributed to William’s tendency to fall asleep.

>> Royal baby now has a name: Louis Arthur Charles

The prince and the Duchess of Cambridge also spent time figuring out what to name the newest member of the royal family and settled on Louis Arthur Charles. Kensington Palace made the announcement Friday. 

Korean leaders meet at border, will sign treaty to formally end war

In an electric moment, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un stepped over the heavily fortified demilitarized zone to shake hands with South Korean President Moon Jae-in, Reuters reported Friday.

>> Read more trending news

Later, both leaders said they would sign a peace treaty this year to formally end the Korean War, CNN reported.

The document, formally called the “Panmunjom Declaration for Peace, Prosperity and Unification on the Korean Peninsula,” was announced after a day of meetings and a 30-minute private conversation between the two leaders. 

“The two leaders solemnly declare ... that there will be no more war on the Korean Peninsula and a new era of peace has begun,” the declaration said. 

“There will not be any more war on the Korean Peninsula, a new era of peace has begun," Moon said. “Chairman Kim Jong Un and I have agreed that complete denuclearization will be achieved, and that is our common goal.”

Smiling and holding hands, the Korean leaders met for the first summit between the two nations in more than a decade. 

It’s the first time since the Korean War ended in 1953 that a leader of North Korea has crossed into the southern section of the DMZ, news outlets reported. Kim then invited Moon to step over the border into North Korea, CNN reported.

>> Historic summit focuses on denuclearization

The two men met at the DMZ, smiling and walking together, which was in stark contrast to last year’s missile tests by North Korea that led to international sanctions, Reuters reported.

“We are at a starting line today, where a new history of peace, prosperity and inter-Korean relations is being written,” Kim said before the two Korean leaders and top aides began talks at the border truce village of Panmunjom.

During their private meeting, Kim told Moon he came to the summit to end the history of conflict and joked he was sorry for keeping Moon up with his late night missile tests, a South Korean official told Reuters.

Kim told Moon he would be willing to visit the presidential Blue House in Seoul, and wanted to meet “more often” in the future, the official said.

Stepping over the border was an impromptu decision by both sides, a spokesman for Moon told CNN.

President Donald Trump tweeted early Friday that “The United States, and all of its GREAT people, should be very proud of what is now taking place in Korea!”

Medieval grave included coffin birth, early neurosurgery

Researchers have made a rare discovery - a medieval woman who died while pregnant who also had  early form of neurosurgery, as well as,  a coffin birth.

A young woman, who experts believe was between the ages of 25 and 35 years old, had a surgery called trepanation and they think it was done only a week before she died sometime in the seventh or eighth century. Trepanation is when a hole is drilled into the skull of a living person. If it was not drilled, the hole was scrapped in the skull. Either way, the hole would be used to treat pain due to trauma or neurological disease, the BBC reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Skulls with trepanation holes have been found all over the world, the BBC reported.

The woman was 38 weeks pregnant when she died, CNN reported.

Researchers found the bones of a fetus along with the woman’s remains in the brick coffin.

They say the baby was a coffin birth or a rare occurrence when the gases that build up during decomposition expel the baby.

Researchers say to find both the coffin birth and the trepanation, especially trepanation during the European early middle ages, in one person’s remains is extremely rare, CNN reported

The study concerning the woman’s remains, which were discovered in 2010, was recently published in the journal for World Neurology.

Doctors don’t know why she had the brain procedure, but speculate that she may have had pre-eclampsia or eclampsia, and that it was used to relieve pressure she had in her head. Bone healing around the hole in her skull shows that she lived about a week after she had the procedure, CNN reported.

The woman, doctors said, was in good health, but she may have had an illness that wouldn’t be reflected in her skeleton. They also are not sure if the baby would have been able to be born alive, but it was late in the pregnancy, as the baby was about 38 weeks, CNN reported.

WATCH: 'Cowboy' hero takes down armed robber in dramatic viral video

A dramatic tackle of an armed robber was caught on surveillance video in Monterrey, northern Mexico, on Monday, The Washington Post reports.

>> Watch the clip here

>> RELATED STORY: Watch: Woman pulls gun on would-be robber, saves husband, family says

In the viral footage, a man wearing a cowboy hat can be seen removing his glasses and tackling a young man who enters a store, pointing a gun at employees. 

The armed robber turned toward another employee a few seconds after entering the store, which is when the "cowboy" seized the opportunity to attack the robber, whose weapon drops to the floor.

>> Read more trending news 

Daniel Cárdenas, one of the shop's owners, identified the quick-thinking hero as his father, store co-owner Reynaldo Cárdenas, the Post reported.

"He really believed that the man was going to shoot them," the younger Cárdenas said of his father, according to the Post. "When he had the chance, he acted instinctively to disarm him."

Read more here.

– The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Photos: Jennifer Lopez, other honorees walk Time 100 Gala red carpet

Jennifer Lopez and other stars attended the Time 100 Gala celebrating the 100 most influential people in the world at Frederick P. Rose Hall, Jazz at Lincoln Center on April 24, 2018, in New York.

Photos: President Trump, Melania host 1st White House state dinner

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania hosted their first White House state dinner, welcoming French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife, Brigitte.

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